Jun 12, 2021  
2020-2021 Undergraduate Catalog 
    
2020-2021 Undergraduate Catalog [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Course Descriptions


 

Forensic Chemistry

  
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    FCM 490 Forensic Chemistry Internship



    This off-campus internship is designed to give students an opportunity to expand and apply their classroom knowledge through workplace-gained experience in forensic chemistry. The site supervisor and faculty supervisor will develop the internship criteria and then evaluate the student’s performance. Prerequisite: CJA 236/237  or FCM 210/211  , CHM 236/237 , CHM 338/339 .

    3 credit hours

Geography

  
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    G 100 World Regional Geography

    Fall-Spring Semesters

    This course introduces you to the discipline of Geography and to a regional geographic approach to understanding our world.  The class explores concepts and tools to understand the discipline as well as the relationship between humans and the natural environment.  It is important to recognize that this course is not an empirical survey of place names and national statistics.  Rather, this course is an exploration of several key issues shaping our world today.  By understanding patterns and processes associated with major political and cultural regions of the world, you will have a more nuanced understanding of the world and your place in an increasingly global society.

    3 credit hours
    Satisfies ADR II.
    Satisfies Foundations - Global Citizenship for “Generation Next”
  
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    G 151/152 Introduction to Physical Geography

    Fall-Spring Semesters

    This course is to introduce students to the physical systems of the Earth, including patterns and processes in the atmosphere (air), hydrosphere (water), lithosphere (land/soil), and biosphere (life). Coupled relationships between physical environmental systems and human system are emphasized. Using the framework of the scientific method, students will  complete weekly labs (2 hour 45 minutes) to reinforce lecture materials. Field trips are included. (G152)

    3 credit hours
    Satisfies ADR III.
    Satisfies Disciplinary Perspectives - Natural/Physical Sciences for “Generation Next”
  
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    G 241 International Service Learning: Making a Difference in a Globalizing World



    This course is the first in a two-part series that integrates academic perspectives on how to make a positive difference in a globalizing world with the experiencee of doing local and international service work. The objective of this semester is to understand contemporary perspectives on globalization, development, and social change in an international context. This course will prepare students to travel to an international destination. Permission of instructor required.

    1 credit hour
    Satisfies Constellations - Children and the Family and Health and Wellness for “Generation Next”
  
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    G 242 International Service Learning: Making a Difference in a Globalizing World



    This course continues to integrate academic perspectives on how to make a positive difference in a globalizing world with the experience of doing local and international service work. The objectives of this semester is for students to think critically about their travel experiencees and to analyze how individual or groups can make positive differences in an increasingly globalized world. Prerequisite: G 241 . Permission of the instructor required.

    2 credit hours
    Satisfies Constellations - Children and the Family and Health and Wellness for “Generation Next”
  
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    G 261 Introduction to Geographic Information Systems

    Fall-Spring Semesters

    This course describes and explains the principles of Geographic Information Systems.  The course will provide an overall introduction about the specific characteristics of spatial data and how our earth is measured and mapped.  It will then focus on how to input, store, analyze and display geographical data using GIS (Geographic Information Systems).  Skills from this class have application in a variety of disciplines such as business, marketing, entrepreneurship, history, government, biology, criminal justice, public health and sustainability studies.

    3 credit hours
    Satisfies Constellations - Environmental Sustainability and Science and Technology for “Generation Next”
  
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    G 330 Migrants, Crossings and Voyages: Migration Past Present

    Fall Semester

    Migration has been a controversial issue historically, globally, and currently it is one of the major issues in locally, nationally and internationally; aspects of migration have been an important issue currently, debated by a variety of groups from politicians, lawyers, law enforcement officials to businessmen to name just the few.  The goal of the course is for the students to examine and identify the global and national waves of migration.  We will start with the history of migration on a global scale and focus on the migration to the U.S.A., and to Pennsylvania.  Our main concern will be the treatment of the “Other” by the host society.  In doing so, we shall discuss the 20th and 21st century migration legislation, and differentiate the “Other” by examining the keywords such as:  a migrant, asylum seeker, a refugee etc.  Finally, the students will design a questionnaire and conduct an interview with the international members of the community to exchange and understand perspectives on both sides of the equation, i.e. host and “Other”.  Their final projects may be showcased to the campus community.

    3 credit hours
    Satisfies Constellations - Diversity and Globalization for “Generation Next”
  
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    G 331 Urban Land Use & Sustainability

    Fall Semester

    This course examines how we understand and try to control human and environmental interactions, focusing on land use to protect humans and environmental quality over multiple generations.  Special attention is given to urbanization and settlement, land use in metropolitan settings, and certain aspects of environmental management and sustainability.  Selected applications, tools, and techniques are used in teaching this as an applied course.

    3 credit hours
    Satisfies Constellations - Community Engagement and Leadership and Professional Development for “Generation Next”
  
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    G 332 Globalizing Economic World

    Spring Semester

    Analysis of world patterns of economic activity and their implications for the global economy. Emphasis is placed on natural resources, population, food supply, trading patterns, and manufacturing and commercial activities. Not open to freshmen.

    3 credit hours
    Satisfies Constellation - Globalization for “Generation Next”
  
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    G 336 Historical Geography of North America

    Spring Semester

    This course offers a broad introduction to the historical geography of the United States through analysis of distinctive elements of regional landscapes. Archival and contemporary photographs, cartographic representations, and many secondary sources are utilized to develop and extend themes presented in the course textbook. Upon completion of this course, students will have a deeper understanding of the issues involved in the analysis of place at a variety of spatial scales. Students will also have a better sense of the historical layering of landscapes you encounter on a daily basis.

    3 credit hours
    Satisfies Constellation - Community Engagement for “Generation Next”
  
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    G 348 Cultures and Environments Field Series

    Summer Semester

    This course is a field study of the human and physical geographies of a particular international destination (a specific destination will be chosen each year). Topics to be covered include: globalization, sustainable tourism, cultural, political and historical geographies, architecture, economic development, climate, landforms, topography, and environmental conservation. Permission of the instructor is required.

    3 credit hours
    Satisfies Constellation - Globalization for “Generation Next”
  
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    G 349 Cultures and Environments Field Series

    Summer Semester

    This course is a field study of the human and physical geographies of a particular international destination (a specific destination will be chosen each year). Topics to be covered include: globalization, sustainable tourism, cultural, political and historical geographies, architecture, economic development, climate, landforms, topography, and environmental conservation. Permission of the instructor is required.

    3 credit hours
    Satisfies Constellation - Globalization for “Generation Next”
  
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    G 352 Geographic Perspectives on Sustainability

    Fall Semester

    This course will examine issues of sustainability at a variety of scales (from local to global) relating to the geographies of resources and resource extraction, production, distribution, consumption, and the disposal of commodities. The class will focus on the relationships between humans and their environments and approach environmental problems by examing the demographic, cultural, and economic processes which have increased resource consumption and waste.

    3 credit hours
    Satisfies Constellation - Environmental Sustainability for “Generation Next”
  
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    G 461 Advanced Geographic Information Systems

    Spring Semester

    This course expands upon skills and knowledge gained from introductory GIS by developing an understanding of additional tools and methods of analyzing spatial data. This course will introduce students to more complex techniques and a deeper theoretical understanding of geographic data management. Students will design, implement, and manage a semester-long project relavant to their field of study. Prerequisite: G 261  

    3 credit hours
    Satisfies Constellations - Environmental Sustainability and Science and Technology for “Generation Next”
  
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    G 470-479 Selected Topics in Geography



    Various advanced topics in the field of Geography. Prerequisite: G 100 .

    3 credit hours
  
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    G 481 Independent Study



    A geography independent study offers students an opportunity to undertake a well-defined research project. While these students conduct their work under the guidance of a faculty member of their own choosing, the project is carried out in an independent manner without regular class meetings. Effective independent study is characterized by a reduction in formal instruction and an increase in the individual student’s responsibility and initiative in the learning process. Prerequisite: Students must have earned 60 or more credits and minimum of 2.5 cumulative grade point average at the time of application and G 100  or permission of the instructor.

    1-3 credit hours
  
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    G 482 Independent Study



    A geography independent study offers students an opportunity to undertake a well-defined research project. While these students conduct their work under the guidance of a faculty member of their own choosing, the project is carried out in an independent manner without regular class meetings. Effective independent study is characterized by a reduction in formal instruction and an increase in the individual student’s responsibility and initiative in the learning process. Prerequisite: Students must have earned 60 or more credits and a minimum of 2.5 cumulative grade point average at the time of application and G 100  or permission of the instructor.

    1-3 credit hours
  
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    G 491 Internship



    A geography internship requires that students engage in supervised academic study through participation in an applied setting. The internship is designed to introduce students to the broad range of geography opportunities available in public or private agencies within the community. Department approval is required in advance. Pass/fail only. Prerequisite: Students are required to spend a minimum of 120 hours work on site. Students must have earned 60 or more credits and a minimum of 2.5 cumulative grade point average at the time of application.

    3 credit hours
  
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    G 492 Internship



    A geography internship requires that students engage in supervised academic study through participation in an applied setting. The internship is designed to introduce students to the broad range of geography opportunities available in public or private agencies within the community. Department approval is required in advance. Pass/fail only. Prerequisite: Students are required to spend a minimum of 120 hours work on site. Students must have earned 60 or more credits and a minimum of 2.5 cumulative grade point average at the time of application.

    3 credit hours

German

  
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    GRM 101 Elementary German I

    Fall Semester

    This course is an introduction to the fundamental patterns and skills (speaking, listening, reading, and writing) of the language. Prerequisite: No prior German, or placement test score of 0-112, or permission of coordinator or chair.

    3 credit hours
  
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    GRM 102 Elementary German II

    Spring Semester

    This course is a continuation of GRM 101 . Before entering this course, students are expected to be able to communicate at a basic level to satisfy immediate needs. In this level, students will learn to communicate beyond the present tense, to participate in short conversations, and to create with the language. Topics will continue to focus on survival skills such as asking/ giving directions, making purchases, arranging transportation, and ordering a meal. Prerequisite: GRM 101  with a grade of at least 2.0, or placement test score of 113-208.

    3 credit hours
  
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    GRM 201 Intermediate German I

    Fall Semester

    This course focuses on further development of the language skills through extensive exposure to spoken German, German conversation and cultural readings. The class is conducted in the target language. Prerequisite: GRM 102  with a grade of at least 2.0, or placement test score of 209-281.

    3 credit hours
  
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    GRM 202 Intermediate German II

    Spring Semester

    This course is a continuation of GRM 201 . Before entering this course, students are expected to be able to use learned material to create with the language. Familiarity with short selections from literature and the ability to answer simple questions about reading selections are expected. Students will be introduced to more advanced structures to further their language skills. Literary and cultural readings are of increasing complexity at this level. Prerequisite: GRM 201  with a grade of at least 2.0, or placement test score of 282 or above.

    3 credit hours
  
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    GRM 203 German for Business



    This course will introduce students to the specialized language of business in German, as well as business practices and behaviors in Germanic cultures. Students will work with contracts, invoices, and resumes, and will conduct role plays including telephone calls and job interviews. Selected grammar topics will be reviewed as applicable. Prerequisite: GRM 201  or permission of the instructor

    3 credit hours
    Satisfies Constellation - Leadership and Professional Development for “Generation Next”
  
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    GRM 205 Intermediate German Conversation



    This course is exclusively designed to strengthen students’ listening comprehension and speaking skills in German. Through personal interactions (dialogues with fellow students and instructor), visual and audio materials, and through individual and group presentations, these two most important and basic skills of language acquisition will be practiced and refined. Prerequisite: GRM 202 .

    3 credit hours
  
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    GRM 206 Reading Strategies in German



    This course focuses on strategies for developing skills needed to read “authentic” texts in German—including paper and online periodicals and short literary and cultural texts. Activities and assignments will be designed to facilitate comprehension, vocabulary expansion, and the oral and written exchange of ideas. In addition to reading texts assigned for the entire class, students will be asked to choose readings in a subject of interest to them in another field of study. Prerequisite: GRM 202  or equivalent.

    3 credit hours
  
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    GRM 220 Culinary Culture of the German-Speaking World

    Spring Semester

    In this course, we will study the role that food plays in the history, identity, and contemporary culture of diverse regions and populations of the German-speaking world.  Activities will include exploration of written texts, videos, recipes, and hands-on experience researching, planning, and presenting a German meal, in conjunction with students from the York College Hospitality Management program.  Taught in English, with an Applied German option.

    3 credit hours
  
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    GRM 221 Pennsylvania German Culture

    Spring Semester

    This course uses York, Pennsylvania, as a launching point to explore the history and impact of the Pennsylvania German culture found in York and the surrounding areas.  Topics will include language, history, religion, cuisine, and art.  Resources will include written material, songs, videos, and field trips.  Taught in English, with an optional Applied German additional component.

    3 credit hours
  
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    GRM 251 Applied German I

    Spring-Fall Semesters

    This is a one-credit course to be taken in conjunction with a course taught in English in any program at York College.  Students will meet one hour a week for discussion in German of a topic pertaining to the English-language course they have chosen to pair with Applied German.  They will also translate a selected portion of a German-language article in the field of the English-language course, and will write a final paper in German summarizing key points studied in the English-language course. Prerequisite: GRM 202   Corequisite: Any York College course taught in English.

    1 credit hour
  
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    GRM 252 Applied German II

    Spring-Fall Semesters

    This is a one-credit course to be taken in conjunction with a course taught in English in any program at York College.  Students will meet one hour a week for discussion in German of a topic pertaining to the English-language course they have chosen to pair with Applied German.  They will also translate a selected portion of a German-language article in the field of the English-language course, and will write a final paper in German summarizing key points studied in the English-language course. Prerequisite: GRM 251   Corequisite: Any York College course taught in English.

    1 credit hour
  
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    GRM 253 Applied German III

    Spring-Fall Semesters

    This is a one-credit course to be taken in conjunction with a course taught in English in any program at York College.  Students will meet one hour a week for discussion in German of a topic pertaining to the English-language course they have chosen to pair with Applied German.  They will also translate a selected portion of a German-language article in the field of the English-language course, and will write a final paper in German summarizing key points studied in the English-language course. Prerequisite: GRM 252   Corequisite: Any York College course taught in English.

    1 credit hour
  
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    GRM 301 Advanced German I

    Fall Semester, alternate years

    This course involves intensive readings, writing essays and reports, and making oral presentations in German. The class is conducted in German. Prerequisite: GRM 202 .

    3 credit hours
  
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    GRM 305 German Culture and Civilization



    This course surveys and traces German civilization from its various tribal beginnings through the turbulent years of Particularism (German disunity), the disintegration of the Holy Roman Empire of German Nation, the power-struggle between Prussia and Austria, to the establishment of a German nation in 1871, and explains the effects of two World Wars, the division of Germany and its final reunification in 1990. It is also an overview of today’s subdivision of German culture as it exists in Germany, Austria, and Switzerland, and introduces the student to the modern and contemporary lifestyles, family traditions, and political as well as economical peculiarities of these German-speaking countries. This course is conducted in German. Prerequisite: GRM 202  

    3 credit hours
    Satisfies Constellations - Diversity and Globalization for “Generation Next”
  
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    GRM 315 German Literature I

    Fall Semester, alternate years

    This course is a survey of selected representative works of German literature from the early Old High German period to the Age of Enlightenment. Prerequisite: GRM 202  

    3 credit hours
  
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    GRM 316 German Literature II



    German Literature II is a survey of selected representative works of German literature beginning with the Age of Romanticism and Classicism to the post-World War Two era. Prerequisite: GRM 202  

    3 credit hours
  
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    GRM 498 Independent Study in German



    This course is an opportunity for a student who wants to improve and apply existing German linguistic and cultural knowledge through a well-defined research project in German and, optionally, a related field. While the student conducts work under the guidance of a faculty member, the project is carried out in an independent manner without regular class meetings. Meetings to discuss the project will be in German. Effective independent study is characterized by a reduction in formal instruction and an increase in the individual student’s responsibility and initiative in the learning process. Prerequisite: GRM 202  Students must have earned 60 or more credits and a minimum of 2.5 cumulative grade point average at the time of application.

    3 credit hours

Gerontology

  
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    GER 100 Perspectives on Aging

    Fall - Spring Semesters

    Perspectives on Aging is a multidisciplinary course that provides a foundation for understanding the human experience of aging. This course will focus on the intersection of social, biological, and psychological aspects of aging as well as demographic trends and careers in aging. Perspectives with which different disciplines approach human aging and the implications of an aging society will be addressed. Students will learn about how concepts in aging can be applied in professional and personal venues.

    3 credit hours
  
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    GER 215 Social Aspects of Aging

    Fall-Spring Semesters

    This course is designed to be an introduction to the sociology of aging. A primary goal of the course is to sensitize students to the special issues of late life. It will include consideration of financial, legal, emotional, social contact and family factors. We will discuss various theoretical frameworks and current methodological issues in the field of gerontology, as well as controversies which exist regarding age-related issues. Prerequisite: SOC 100  or instructor’s permission

    3 credit hours
    Satisfies Constellations - Diversity and Health and Wellness for “Generation Next”
  
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    GER 312 Psychological Aspects of Aging

    Fall-Spring Semesters

    This course is designed to provide students with a broad understanding of major topics and theories relevant to the cognitive, emotional, and developmental topics in aging. Students will investigate health behaviors, sensation and perception, cognitive abilities, personality, social interactions, motivation and emotion, psychological disorders, end-of-life issues, and successful aging. The course will also focus on the methods used to conduct research with an aging population. Does not satisfy Psychology major requirements or Psychology electives. This course is cross-listed as PSY 312 . Prerequisite: PSY 100  

    3 credit hours
    Satisfies Constellations - Children and the Family and Health and Wellness for “Generation Next”
  
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    GER 320 Working with Older Adults

    Fall and Spring

    This course will focus on the skills needed to work successfully with older persons. It will emphasize knowing the client, knowing the available support systems, and helping with the decision-making process to encourage independence and adequate care. Prerequisite: GER 100  or GER 215  or GER 312  / PSY 312 , or permission of the Instructor

    3 credit hours
    Satisfies Constellation - Professionalism/Leader/Ent for “Generation Next”
  
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    GER 330 Death, Dying, and Bereavement

    Fall - Spring Semesters

    This course offers a broad overview of the psychological aspects and individual and societal attitudes of death and dying in our society. Topics include attitudes toward and preparation for death; the understanding of and care for terminally ill patients; funeral rituals; burial, mourning, and grief practices; grief counseling; suicide and euthanasia. Readings and classroom activities will be supplemented by students’ self-exploration and writing on feelings, attitudes, and beliefs about death.

    3 credit hours
    Satisfies Constellations - Children and the Family and Health and Wellness for “Generation Next”
  
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    GER 390 Selected Topics in Gerontology

    Spring Semester

    A study of a specific topic of interest to gerontologists, including, but not limited to public policy, controversial issues, abuse issues, and group work with the elderly.

    3 credit hours
  
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    GER 391 Selected Topics in Gerontology

    Fall Semester

    A study of a specific topic of interest to gerontologists, including, but not limited to public policy, controversial issues, abuse issues, and group work with the elderly.

    3 credit hours
  
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    GER 392 Selected Topics in Gerontology

    Spring Semester

    A study of a specific topic of interest to gerontologists, including, but not limited to public policy, controversial issues, abuse issues, and group work with the elderly.

    3 credit hours
  
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    GER 410 Health In Later Years

    Spring

    A survey of the known physiological changes of the aging process and their psychological consequences. Present research in cellular, immunological, perceptual, and neurological changes will be emphasized. Prerequisite: GER 215  OR GER315 or permission of the instructor

    3 credit hours
    Satisfies Constellation - Health and Wellness for “Generation Next”
  
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    GER 491 Validation Method: Part I

    Fall Semester

    This course is designed to provide students with an in-depth understanding of the Validation Method. This is an experiential course in which students will be exposed to foundational materials through readings and lectures. They will then practice principles of the Validation Method weekly with older adults (who reside on a memory support unit in a retirement community) who are in the first two phases of dementia. Those who pass the class with a grade of 75 or better will receive a certificate of completion for Phases I and II. Ger491 Validation Method: Part I is a prerequisite for GER 492 Validation Method: Part II. Students who successfully complete both GER 491 and GER 492 will be eligible to become Certified Validation Workers as recognized by Validation Training Institute. Prerequisite: GER 312 /PSY 312  (Cross -listed course)

    3 credit hours
  
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    GER 492 Validation Method: Part II

    Spring Semester

    This course is designed to build on knowledge and skills gained in GER 491. Validation Method II is an experiential course in which students will apply foundational materials through readings and lectures. They will practice principles of the Validation Method with residents of senior care facilities with a focus on working with individuals who are in the last two phases of dementia. Students who complete GER 492 with a grade of 75 or better and pass the written and practical portions of the Validation Worker exam with at least 75% will become Certified Validation Workers as recognized by Validation Training Institute. Prerequisite: GER 491  

    3 credit hours
  
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    GER 498 Gerontology Independent Study



    The Independent Study Program affords an opportunity for the student who wishes to undertake a well-defined research project. While the student conducts his work under the guidance of a faculty member of his own choosing, the project is carried out in an independent manner without regular class meetings. Effective independent study is characterized by a reduction in formal instruction and an increase in the individual student’s responsibility and initiative in the learning process. Prerequisite: Students must have earned 60 or more credits and a minimum of 2.5 cumulative grade point average at the time of application.

    1-3 credit hours each semester
  
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    GER 499 Gerontology Independent Study



    The Independent Study Program affords an opportunity for the student who wishes to undertake a well-defined research project. While the student conducts his work under the guidance of a faculty member of his own choosing, the project is carried out in an independent manner without regular class meetings. Effective independent study is characterized by a reduction in formal instruction and an increase in the individual student’s responsibility and initiative in the learning process. Prerequisite: Students must have earned 60 or more credits and a minimum of 2.5 cumulative grade point average at the time of application.

    1-3 credit hours each semester

Health Professions

  
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    BHA 310 Public Health Administration



    This course offers an overview of the scope and history of health administration, as well as core issues in public health.  The course includes key public health concepts and terms.  Students will explore determinants to public health and their effects on human populations.  Healthy People Initiatives will be reviewed and the impact of policy on health disparities in urban communities is discussed.

    3 credit hours
  
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    BHA 400 Healthcare Insurance Reimbursment



    This course offers advanced knowledge of health insurance products and managed care approaches to the financing and delivery of healthcare services.  Students explore reimbursement and payment methodologies.  Concepts in insurance, third-party and prospective payments, and managed care organizations are discussed.

    3 credit hours
  
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    BHA 410 Managerial Epidemiology



    This course is designed to provide an overview of epidemiological principles and tools applicable to decision making in healthcare.  Students will apply principles and tools of epidemiology in the study of healthcare management, with a focus on quality and planning.  The goals of the course are to explore the use of epidemiological tools to design effective healthcare programs, manage healthcare resources efficiently, plan strategically for healthcare services, and strengthen healthcare decision-making. Prerequisite: MAT 120 MAT 171 , or BEH 260  

    3 credit hours
  
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    BHA 414 Research and Evidence-Based Practice



    Professionals in healthcare fields may be called upon to supervise or interact with people who engage in research or systematically use the results of research to improve patient outcomes.  They therefore need to understand the basics of the research method in the biomedical sciences, understand the importance of this research for the larger society, be able to identify the basic elements of technical biomedical writing, give an account of how research results may reasonably differ, and talk in layman’s terms about this research.  Students learn and practice these skills in this course.  This course has no prerequisites, and all background information and skills specific to the assignments will be taught during the course.

    3 credit hours
  
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    BHA 415 Administration of Healthcare Systems



    This course offers an analysis of administrative structures and inter-organization arrangements among hospital and other health care organization.  The course offers a foundation in general management and economic principles related to hospital administration.  Students will review policy required by the Joint Commission on Accreditation of Healthcare Organizations (JCAHO), and the Department of Health (DOH), in managing hospitals, long term care organizations, and public health organizations.

    3 credit hours
  
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    BHA 420 Health Information Law and Regulations



    This course offers an introduction to utilization management (UM) the process of reviewing use, delivery, and cost-effectiveness of healthcare.  Students will review procedures that improve patient outcomes and resource utilization.  The course describes the origins and purpose of UM, including a comparison of concurrent and retrospective review. Students are provided with an overview of UM roles an responsibilities, and medical staff responsibilities for the process.

    3 credit hours
  
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    BHA 440 Healthcare Administration Capstone



    The culmination of Healthcare Administration coursework sets the groundwork for this capstone course.  The course requires students to broaden their knowledge by synthesizing program content to healthcare decision-making, multidisciplinary collaboration, and evidence based management practices to achieve high quality, patient satisfaction, and fiscally sound operations.  This course serves as an important bridge between the classroom and the world of professional practice.

    3 credit hours
  
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    HSC 100 Exploration of Health Professions



    This course offers a professional orientation for health profession majors and others interested in learning more about these and other health related fields.  Trends, issues and ethical dilemmas in health care that impact practice in various health care professions will be presented by students, faculty and representatives from different areas of health care.  Other topics include; specialized methodologies, recent developments, and descriptions of how the various disciplines interact and complement one another.

    1 credit hour
  
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    HSC 105 Medical Terminology for Health Professions



    An introduction to medical terminology including prefixes, suffixes, roots, and abbreviations. Also included are use of medical dictionaries and the format of the patient chart.   

    1 credit hour

History

  
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    HIS 101 The Foundation of the West

    Fall-Spring Semesters

    This course explores the concepts, practices, and methods of the discipline of history using the history of the western world, or what is called Western Civilization, from the earliest civilizations in the contemporary Middle East, through the aftermath of the religious and political ruptures associated with the Reformation.  This course will allow students to develop critical thinking skills associated with analyzing the historical sources used to reconstruct and interpret the past.  The following topics will be discussed: early civilizations; the ancient world, including Greece and Rome; the rise of Christianity; Europe after the decline of the Roman Empire; the Middle Ages; Western interaction with the non-West; the Renaissance; the Reformation.  Political, economic, cultural and social developments will be explored.

    3 credit hours
    Satisfies ADR IV.
    Satisfies Disciplinary Perspectives - Humanities for “Generation Next”
  
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    HIS 102 The West in the World

    Fall-Spring Semesters

    This course investigates the major trends in Western civilization in the context of global developments from the sixteenth century to the present.  Students will examine the political, economic, social, and cultural developments that characterize the history of the West in that period, and also consider the historical roots of present global or international issues as they develop through interactions between the West and other world regions.

    3 credit hours
    Satisfies ADR IV.
    Satisfies Foundations - Global Citizenship for “Generation Next”
  
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    HIS 111 American Civilization I

    Fall-Spring Semesters

    This course provides a survey of American Civilization from the Age of Exploration to the end of the American Civil War. Among the topics to be examined will be: European exploration of North America, Native American civilization, European settlement and the evolution of colonial British America, the American Revolution, the creation of the American nation, the early national experience, early nineteenth century growth and expansion of the nation, the Antebellum experience, and the American Civil War. These topics will be presented chronologically with an emphasis on the evolution of a distinctive American culture and character.

    3 credit hours
    Satisfies Foundations - American Citizenship for “Generation Next”
  
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    HIS 112 American Civilization II

    Fall-Spring Semesters

    This course provides a survey of American Civilization from Reconstruction after the American Civil War to the present. Among the topics to be examined will be: post Civil War Reconstruction of the nation, westward expansion in the late nineteenth century, industrialization, Progressive reform in industrial America, World War I, the Great Depression, World War II, the Cold War, Vietnam and the Great Society, and America in the late twentieth century. These topics will be presented chronologically with an emphasis on the evolution of a distinctive American culture and character.

    3 credit hours
    Satisfies Foundations - American Citizenship for “Generation Next”
  
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    HIS 121 World History I

    Fall-Spring Semesters

    This course introduces students to global historical developments from prehistory to 1750. Using both a chronological and thematic approach, this course will facilitate the student’s understanding of the international framework in which major societies developed and interacted in that timeframe. This course will explore geographical, cultural, political, economic, and social aspects of that history in specific regions, primarily in the non-Western (typically considered to be outside of Europe and the United States) world, and will allow students to compare and contrast developments across time and geographic space.

    3 credit hours
  
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    HIS 122 World History II

    Fall-Spring Semesters

    This course introduces students to global historical developments from 1750 to the present. Using both a chronological and thematic approach, this course will facilitate the student’s understanding of the international framework in which major societies developed and interacted in that timeframe. This course will explore geographical, cultural, political, economic, and social aspects of that history in specific regions, primarily in the non-Western (typically considered to be outside of Europe and the United States) world, and will allow students to compare and contrast developments across time and geographic space.

    3 credit hours
  
  •  

    HIS 200 Methods and Theory in History

    Fall-Spring Semesters

    This course introduces the students to methods and theories employed when doing historical research and interpretation. The course will prepare the students for advanced work in the field. Students will develop a wide array of research methods, interpretive techniques, analytical strategies, and presentation approaches. Students will also explore the philosophy of history and survey the ways that historical methods and interpretations have evolved. At the conclusion of the semester, students will demonstrate their understanding of course material by producing an interpretive scholarly historical essay. Prerequisite: HIS 101 , HIS 102 , HIS 111 , or HIS 112 .

    3 credit hours
  
  •  

    HIS 201 Introduction to Public History

    Fall Semester

    In the field of public history, historical learning is disseminated to a broader public through a wide variety of means.  This course will introduce some key issues in understanding the field of public history and the common challenges it represents. This course will expose students to a number of different kinds of public history work such as museum studies, archival work, historical interpretation, historic preservation, and digital history.  Students will explore the conflicted terrain of public historical memory to better understand the decision processes that people, societies, and institutions make about what history to preserve and how to present that history to a broader public.

    3 credit hours
  
  •  

    HIS 205 Oral History: Techniques and Research



    Oral history is a technique for creating and preserving original information. It is both a research method and a teaching tool. Through informed and empathetic interviewing, we acquire information about families, individuals, and organizations. Conducted properly, oral history is a limitless technique for exploring and documenting the variety of human experiences. Local projects have included oral histories of well-known area residents, the paper industry, Holocaust survivors, Vietnam Veterans, World War II veterans, the Greek-American community, and York College.

    3 credit hours
    Satisfies Constellation - Community Engagement for “Generation Next”
  
  •  

    HIS 206 Introduction to Museum Studies



    This course is designed to provide students with a broad introduction to the field of museum work, with particular attention to history museums. Although the course focuses on history museums, the basic principles presented in this course apply to other types of museums as well, including those dedicated to science, art, or nature. Topics included will be: philosophy of museums; social, economic, and political trends that affect museums; staffing, management and financing; multiples functions of museums, including care of objects, exhibition design, interpretation, education, research, and public relations.

    3 credit hours
  
  •  

    HIS 301 Medieval Civilization



    The thousand-year period from approximately 450 to 1450, known as the Middle Ages, was a formative period in the development of much of Europe and the Middle East, and brought western civilization from antiquity to the brink of modernity. This course will provide an examination of the history and culture of the Middle Ages, and will explore traditional themes in medieval history, such as the rise of Christianity and the Church, growth and evolution of the feudal and manorial systems, state building, and late medieval crises and conflicts, as well as the social and cultural experiences of men and women from all walks of life.

    3 credit hours
  
  •  

    HIS 305 American Military History

    Fall - Spring Semesters

    This course provides an overview of the military history of the United States, from the colonial era to the present.  It blends the “traditional” approach to military history - focused on strategies, battles, and commanders - with a look at warfare and military institutions within the context of the nation’s economic, political, social, and intellectual life.  Among other topics, the course will examine why America has chosen to go to war; how its wars were fought; who fought them (and why); how the outcome was shaped; and what impact this had on individuals and the country as a whole.

    3 credit hours
  
  •  

    HIS 310 Medieval Military History



    The Middle Ages was a bellicose era, whose popular associations today include castles, crusaders, brutal barbarian attacks, the ubiquitous “knight in shining armor” and the knightly ethos of chivalry.  This course will trace the history of Western warfare from the end of the Roman Empire to the late fifteenth century, as well as covering strategy, tactics, combatants, technology, diplomacy, the role of religion, the effects on non-military society, and the social, political and economic circumstances surrounding medieval warfare.

    3 credit hours
    Satisfies Constellations - Peace and Conflict and Science and Technology for “Generation Next”
  
  •  

    HIS 315 History of Technology to 1550



    This course will examine the relationship between technology and human society from antiquity to the early modern period on the eve of immense scientific and technological breakthroughs. Students will investigate, through hands-on-methods, how technology influenced the development of society, how society influenced the development of technology, and how people in society viewed technology.

    3 credit hours
    Satisfies Constellation - Science & Technology for “Generation Next”
  
  •  

    HIS 320 Europe after 1914



    This course will examine the history of Europe from World War I to the recent past. In this period, Europe went from the height of its power into war, genocide, and division between East and West. Since 1990 and the end of the Cold War, Europe has faced new challenges, including ethnic violence, economic difficulties, multiculturalism, and globalization. Course themes include the problem of war and peace; dictatorship and democracy; racism/genocide and tolerance; the state and the people; East/West divisions; and European integration.

    3 credit hours
  
  •  

    HIS 330 History of Britain I



    This course examines the history of Britain from the Anglo-Saxon period to the “Glorious Revolution” of 1688.  It focuses on the development of Britain’s distinctive political institutions, the abiding role of religion in society, the rise of secular culture, and evolution of gender relations.

    3 credit hours
    Satisfies Constellations - Peace and Conflict and Leadership and Professional Development for “Generation Next”
  
  •  

    HIS 331 History of Britain II



    This course examines the history of Britain from the “Glorious Revolution” of 1688 to the present.  During this period Britain became the modern world’s first superpower with a colonial empire that spanned the globe and an industrialized economy that dominated world trade.  Although Britain lost both its empire and its economic power in the 20th Century, it has retained a cultural significance out of proportion to its size.  We will try to understand Britain’s dramatic rise and fall by examining political, social, economic, and cultural developments over time.

    3 credit hours
    Satisfies Constellations - Globalization and Leadership and Professional Development for “Generation Next”
  
  •  

    HIS 333 British Empire



    This course traces the development and decline of the British Empire from the 17th century to the present, paying particular attention to the 19th and early 20th century when the Empire was at its peak.

    3 credit hours
    Satisfies Constellations - Diversity and Globalization for “Generation Next”
  
  •  

    HIS 350 American Colonial History (1607-1760)



    This course examines the colonial origins of the United States including a study of institutions, values, thought, and cultural development prior to the American Revolution. Emphasis is given to the roots of this nation’s political, economic, social, and constitutional traditions.

    3 credit hours
    Satisfies Constellations - Diversity and Globalization and Peace and Conflict for “Generation Next”
  
  •  

    HIS 352 The Revolutionary Era in America



    This course examines the period in American history between the mid-eighteenth century and 1815.  The course begins with a examination of the various tensions that culminated in American independence in 1776.  The course also investigates the difficulties involved in securing independence, creating an American government and the struggles the new nation faced during the early national period.  The course concludes with an assessment of the War of 1812 as the final phase of the American Revolution.

    3 credit hours
    Satisfies Constellations - Leadership and Professional Development and Peace and Conflict for “Generation Next”
  
  •  

    HIS 353 The Jacksonian Era (Middle Period, 1816-1846)



    This course presents an analysis of the political, economic, and social forces which characterized the Jacksonian period in American history. Emphasis is given to growing sectional tensions, major personalities, and popular culture of early 19th century America.

    3 credit hours
  
  •  

    HIS 362 Human Trafficking and Slavery, Then and Now

    Fall-Spring Semesters

    This course will explore the long history of slavery in America and beyond.  We have often been taught that the Civil War ended slavery, but this is not exactly true.  Contemporary slavery is a growing global phenomenon, and more people are enslaved now than at the time Abraham Lincoln signed the Emancipation Proclamation.  Students will examine the rise and fall of legal race-based slavery in the Atlantic World, study how new forms of slavery persisted in post-Civil War America, and then turn to an exploration of global slavery today, considering finally what lessons might be learned from the historical abolitionist movement to be applied to the fight to end slavery in our lifetimes.

    3 credit hours
    Satisfies Constellations - Diversity and Globalization for “Generation Next”
  
  •  

    HIS 363 Coming of the Civil War 1846-1861



    This course will examine the conflicting currents in American history between 1846-1861 that led the nation into the Civil War. Particular attention will be given to the intricate relationships between slavery, racism, economics, and politics.  This course is one of the Proseminar courses that can be taken as a prerequesite for History Seminar.

    3 credit hours
    Satisfies Constellations - Diversity and Leadership and Professional Development for “Generation Next”
  
  •  

    HIS 364 Civil War and Reconstruction, 1861-1877



    This course will analyze the political, economic, and military ramifications of the Civil War. It will also examine the relationships between politics, economics, and race during the Reconstruction period in order to gain an understanding of both the limits and legacy of that era.

    3 credit hours
    Satisfies Constellations - Diversity, Leadership and Professional Development and Peace and Conflict for “Generation Next"
  
  •  

    HIS 366 Twentieth Century American History, 1914-1945



    This course will examine American history from 1914 to 1945, a topsy-turvy period during which time Americans experienced a boom, a bust, and two world wars. Among the subjects that the class will examine closely are: the Red Scare, the Scopes Trial, Prohibition, the Great Crash, the New Deal, and the home front during World War II.

    3 credit hours
    Satisfies Constellation - Peace & Conflict for “Generation Next”
  
  •  

    HIS 367 Recent America, 1945-Present



    This course provides an intensive examination of U.S. history from 1945 to the present. Emphasis will be placed on the Cold War, the civil rights, women’s and antiwar movements of the 1960s, and the economic changes of the 1970s and 1980s.

    3 credit hours
    Satisfies Constellations - Globalization and Peace & Conflict for “Generation Next”
  
  •  

    HIS 370 History of Alcohol and Drugs in American Life

    Fall-Spring Semesters

    This course analyzes how alcohol and drugs have shaped American cultural and political life from colonial times to the present.  Considering a range of issues including the role of taverns in the American Revolution , the gender dynamics that promoted Prohibition, drugs in the 60s counterculture, and the recent urban crack-cocaine epidemic, this course treats the study of American substance use, abuse, and regulation as a vital window into the evolution of American society.  Recognizing the diverse meanings attached to alcohol, and later, illicit drugs, by users, purveyors, and opponents, this course challenges students to better understand the history of American sociocultural development.

    3 credit hours
    Satisfies Constellations - Diversity and Health and Wellness for “Generation Next”
  
  •  

    HIS 371 American Constitutionalism (I): Structures of Government

    Fall Semester

    This course will examine the foundations and development of the American constitutional system focusing on the structures of government. Particular attention will be given to the writing of the U.S. Constitution and the evolution of constitutional law as it relates to federalism, separation of powers, judicial review, and the meaning of democracy. This course is cross-listed as PS 371 .

    3 credit hours
    Satisfies Constellation - Leadership and Professional Development for “Generation Next”
  
  •  

    HIS 372 American Constitutionalism (II): Civil Rights and Liberties

    Spring Semester

    This course will examine the foundations and development of civil rights and liberties within the American constitutional system. Particular attention will be given to the ratification debates concerning the Bill of Rights and the evolving constitutional status of speech, religion, racial and gender equality, privacy, death penalty, as well as a host of contemporary debates involving gay rights, gun control, affirmative action, and campaign financing. This course is cross-listed as PS 372 .

    3 credit hours
    Satisfies Constellation - Diversity for “Generation Next”
  
  •  

    HIS 375 American Economic History



    This course studies the development of the American economy from colonial times to present with an emphasis on the late 19th and 20th centuries, stressing the growth of labor, rise of big business, and the changing role of government in the nation’s economy from the Civil War to present.

    3 credit hours
  
  •  

    HIS 386 Historical Geography of North America



    This course offers a broad introduction to the historical geography of the United States through analysis of distinctive elements of regional land­scapes. Archival and contemporary photographs, cartographic, representations, and many secondary sources are utilized to develop and extend themes presented in the course textbook. Upon completion of this course, students will have a deeper understanding of the issues involved in the analysis of place at a variety of spatial scales. They will also have a better sense of the historical layering of landscapes they encounter on a daily basis. This course is cross-listed as G 336 .

    3 credit hours
    Satisfies Constellation - Community Engagement for “Generation Next”
  
  •  

    HIS 387 North American Environmental History



    Environmental history studies the changing relationship between human beings and the natural world through time. This course will examine a variety of influential issues and themes, from the pre-colonial period to the present, including the impact of settlement on the land and the rise of the modern environmental movement. The central premise throughout the course will be that much of the familiar terrain of American history looks very different when seen in its environmental context, and that one can learn a great deal about both history and the environment by studying the two together.

    3 credit hours
    Satisfies Constellation - Environmental Sustainability for “Generation Next”
  
  •  

    HIS 388 Race and Racism in the Americas



    This course provides a historical survey of race and racism in the United States and the Atlantic world. The course will include an examination of the historical experience of various minority groups (i.e., Blacks, Indians, Hispanics, Asians), and a study of political, legal, economic, cultural, and social aspects of racism. Course content will also provide students with a comparative examination of concepts of race and racism between the United States and other areas of the world.

    3 credit hours
    Satisfies Constellations - Diversity and Peace and Conflict for “Generation Next”
  
  •  

    HIS 390 Women in the United States: A History



    This course will analyze the history of women in the United States from the colonial period to the present. The course will attempt to help students understand the impact which political, social, economic, and racial aspects of American history have had on American women, and, conversely, the impact women in the United States have had on developments within these areas. This course is cross-listed as WGS 342 .

    3 credit hours
    Satisfies Constellation - Children and the Family for “Generation Next”
  
  •  

    HIS 391 Women and War



    This course will analyze military conflict from the perspective of gender. The experience of women will be the focus of the course, but the course will also examine how gendered concepts related to being male and female play a role in the making of war. Students will analyze the effects of war on women’s status and will examine the impact of war on gender roles and the relationship between men and women. Course content will be drawn from major world conflicts, including WWI and WWII, as well as post-World War II regional and national conflicts. This course is cross-listed as WGS 340 .

    3 credit hours
    Satisfies Constellation - Peace and Conflict for “Generation Next”
  
  •  

    HIS 392 History of Intelligence



    This course will examine the history of government collection of secret intelligence in the West from the early modern period to the present.  It analyzes the historical evolution of intelligence gathering, focusing on the systems developed by the major powers, especially Britain, the United States and the Soviet Union/Russia.  Students will also assess the nature of the contribution of intelligence services to ensuring domestic security and to the functioning of the international system in peace and war.

    3 credit hours
  
  •  

    HIS 393 American Foreign Policy

    Spring Semester

    This course provides an introduction to U.S. foreign policy; it will explore the conduct of U.S. relations with other countries in the world. Topics will include the rise of America, U.S. foreign policy during and after the Cold War and the complex issues facing the U.S. in the post-Cold War era. Emphasis will be on American foreign policy toward different geopolitical regions. Fundamental American values in foreign policy will be examined, as well as a broad range of perspectives of leading scholars.  This course is cross listed with PS303.

    3 credit hours
    Satisfies Constellations - Globalization and Peace & Conflict for “Generation Next”
  
  •  

    HIS 395 Special Topics in American History



    These courses provide coverage of topics of special interest in American history.

    3 credit hours
  
  •  

    HIS 396 Special Topics in American History



    These courses provide coverage of topics of special interest in American history.

    3 credit hours
  
  •  

    HIS 397 Special Topics in World History



    These courses provide coverage of topics of special interest in world (non-U.S.) history.

    3 credit hours
  
  •  

    HIS 398 Special Topics in World History



    These courses provide coverage of topics of special interest in world (non-U.S.) history.

    3 credit hours
  
  •  

    HIS 399 Special Topics in Public History



    Courses offered under the Special Topics in Public History are designed to provide students with an in depth study of one of the branches of public history. The focus of these courses would be on professional skills development and their application in a site of public history. Examples of Special Topics in Public History include archiving; history education at public sites; historic preservation and the politics of the urban environment, monuments and memorials; preserving American material culture.

    3 credit hours
    Satisfies Constellations - Creativity & The Arts and Science and Technology for “Generation Next”
 

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