Sep 28, 2020  
2019-2020 Graduate Catalog 
    
2019-2020 Graduate Catalog [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Course Descriptions


 

Master of Accounting

  
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    ACC 515 Accounting Theory

    Fall Semester

    This course is a study of the role of accounting in society and the theory that provides the underpinning for modern financial reporting.  The course provides an understanding of the issues and development of Generally Accepted Accounting Principles and major stakeholders in developing accounting standards.  The course examines the economic forces, competing interests, and regulatory institutions that shape the way regulators make accounting policy choices.  In addition to discussing accounting in its familiar role as an income measurement tool and as an input to decisions under uncertainty, students study how efficient markets, compensation practices, debt covenants, and other broad economic consequences impact accounting policy makers. 3 credit hours
  
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    ACC 524 Federal Tax Planning and Research



    This course will provide an introduction to fundamental concepts of federal law impacting individuals and corporations. The focus will be on understanding how to integrate tax strategy into the bigger picture of corporate decision-making and will incorporate Internal Revenue Code sections, Treasury regulations, and research in online legal databases and current journal publications.  Students will gain a broad exposure to the tax implications of business decisions ranging from corporate formation to corporate acquisitions and divestitures. Students will also be introduced to how tax planning decisions affect financial metrics.  This course is cross listed with MBA524. 3 credit hours
  
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    ACC 528 Special Topics in Accounting

    Fall, Spring, and Summer Semesters

    This course provides a continuing in-depth study of Accounting principles and current concepts.  Subjects may include contemporary accounting issues, ethical concerns in accounting, govermental units, non-profit organizations, multinational enterprises, and fiduciaries.  Course is limited to MAcc students. 3 credit hours
  
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    ACC 538 Controllership Issues



    This course will provide a comprehensive overview of the roles and responsibilities of controllers in today’s corporate environment. Students will learn the controller’s role in facilitating investor relationships, internal control, profit planning, cost control, external financial reporting, and best practices in long range and short-term planning. The course will address internal managerial reporting, external financial reporting, and governmental tax reporting as well as the relationship between the function of the controller and other corporate executive functions.  This course is cross listed with MBA538. 3 credit hours
  
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    ACC 548 Advanced Managerial Accounting

    Fall, Spring, and Summer Semesters

    An advanced study of managerial accounting and its use as a tool of management. The course stresses the analysis and presentation of accounting data for use by management in decision making and planning. Subject areas include cost allocation, inventory planning and control, joint-product costing, by-product costs, cost behavior patterns, and sales and production mix.  Course is restricted to MAcc students. 3 credit hours
  
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    ACC 552 Accounting Information Systems



    This course investigates and analyzes the role of accounting information systems (AIS) within companiesʼ operating environments. Emphasis is placed upon internal controls, current technology (including databases), application of AIS, and AIS auditing techniques.  This course is cross listed with MBA552. 3 credit hours
  
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    ACC 562 Financial Statement Analysis



    An intensive study of financial statement analysis, with emphasis on description and explanation of the demand and supply forces underlying the provision of financial statement data, properties of the numbers derived from financial statements, key aspects of decisions that use financial statement information, and features of the environment in which these decisions are made.  This course is cross listed with MBA562. 3 credit hours
  
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    ACC 565 Fraud and Forensics

    Spring Semester

    Students will pursue an in-depth study of fraudulent financial accounting with a focus on fraud examination.  The course also introduces the basics of forensic accounting.  Through a series of readings, studies, problems and cases, students will use their background in accounting and audit to improve skills and techniques in the identification of fraud in the workplace and the impact on public reporting parties and markets. 3 credit hours
  
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    ACC 571 Advanced Auditing

    Fall, Spring, and Summer Semesters

    This course will provide a deeper analysis of auditing and its value to capital markets.  Course content will focus on tools, test procedures, and processes used to audit an organization during various accounting cycles.  The course will also provide an understanding of the client selection process, sampling techniques, and the audit conclusion phase including the issuance of the final audit opinion.  The role and responsibilities of internal auditing are also addressed. 3 credit hours
  
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    ACC 572 Corporate Finance



    Analytical approach to the management of financial resources and the selection of financing alternatives. Includes working capital, capital budget management, and the analysis of alternative investments and short- to long-range sources of financing.  This course is cross listed with MBA572. 3 credit hours
  
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    ACC 580 Advanced Accounting

    Fall Semester

    An in-depth study of accounting principles and current concepts in which theory and practice are reconciled.  Subjects include accounting for business combinations, preparing consolidated financial statements, segment and interim reporting, accounting for partnerships, and accounting for international transactions.  The course also covers accounting for foreign currency hedges and translating foreign businesses in US dollars. 3 credit hours
  
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    ACC 590 Graduate Accounting Internship



    This course provides a planned and supervised work experience at selected, cooperating firms.  Internships require students to meet periodically with a faculty supervisor, provide written deliverables, and participate in an end-of-internship evaluation.  The student is expected to complete at least 120 hours over the semester. 3 credit hours

Master of Business Administration

  
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    MBA 500 Continuous Enrollment



    Students must register for this zero credit status when not registering for any credit bearing course(s). The Continuous Enrollment status ensures that the student does not lose their matriculation for that semester.  See Continuous Enrollment Policy for further important information. (0 credits)
  
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    MBA 501 Graduate Survey of Accounting



    An accelerated basic course surveying the principles and procedures of accounting. Satisfies the accounting prerequisite for enrollment in the MBA program. Credits are not applicable toward MBA degree. Open to all MBA students. (3 credits)
  
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    MBA 502 Graduate Survey of Economics



    An accelerated basic course surveying economic theory. Satisfies the economic prerequisite for enrollment in the MBA program. Credits are not applicable toward MBA degree. Open to all MBA students. (3 credits)
  
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    MBA 503 Survey of Marketing and Management



    An analysis of the managerial functions of planning, organizing, leading, and controlling and an analysis of various marketing activities and strategies. Additional topics include ethics, social responsibility, globalization, consumer behavior, organizational behavior, decision making, pricing strategies, distribution, and promotion. The course is designed to encourage a diagnostic management style and an appreciation for the dynamic nature of todayʼs marketing challenges and opportunities. Credits are not applicable toward MBA degree. Open to all MBA students. (3 credits)
  
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    MBA 504 Legal, Ethical, and Global Environment of Business



    This course prepares the business professional to consider legal consequences in planning and implementing strategies. It recognizes that law and ethics are an integral part of business and business decisions. This course focuses on the legal, ethical, judicial, regulatory, and competitive nature of business organizations in a global environment. This course uses a combination of statutory review, case analysis, and commentary. Credits are not applicable toward MBA degree. Open to all MBA students. (3 credits)
  
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    MBA 505 Foundations of Statistics



    This course would provide a statistical base for students entering the MBA program. Subjects to be covered would include, but not be limited to, descriptive statistics, probability and probability distributions, analysis of variances, chi square tests, nonparametric statistics, index numbers and aggregate price indexes, forecasting and time series analysis. All students admitted into the MBA program would be required to complete this course or show their proficiency by testing out of the course. Open to all MBA students. MBA505 may be waived upon satisfactory completion of the Statistics Proficiency Exam. Contact the MBA Office to schedule the examination. (3 credits)
  
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    MBA 512 Business Analytics



    This course provides an introduction to the field of business analytics, which has been defined as the extensive use of data, statistical and quantitative analysis, exploratory and predictive models, and factbased management to inform decisions and actions. The development and use of data warehouses and data marts to support business analytics is discussed. The course has a focus on practical IT skills required to model and solve business problems. It is an inter-disciplinary course that draws upon problems from accounting, finance, marketing, production, and human resource fields. The course emphasizes learning-by-doing using Excel and its add-ons as the primary tool. (3 credits)
  
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    MBA 513 Organizational Dynamics



    This course is designed to improve understanding of organizational dynamics, including a review of phenomena at the interpersonal, group, and organizational levels.  It includes a review of various approaches to understanding organizations and an examination of factors that affect organizational performance.  Concepts reviewed in this course include team and organization structure, employee well-being and motivation, conflict management, emotional intelligence, organizational culture, and power and the political aspects of organizations.  Students will be encouraged to evaluate their own managerial philosophies, and effectively apply theory to address current challenges faced by managers and organizational leaders. (3 credits)
  
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    MBA 514 Public Policy & Business

    201220

    This course examines the economic, political, and social principles governing the operation of business.  Among the topics stressed are demand and supply analysis, excise taxes and subsidies, market structures, fiscal and monetary policy, regulation, and the motivation for global trade.  Contemporary policy issues facing government agencies, and how they affect both private and public business sectors, are studied.  Mathematical models are utilized to interpret regression analysis. (3 credits)
  
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    MBA 524 Federal Tax Planning and Research



    This course will provide an introduction to fundamental concepts of federal law impacting individuals and corporations. The focus will be on understanding how to integrate tax strategy into the bigger picture of corporate decision-making and will incorporate Internal Revenue Code sections, Treasury regulations, and research in online legal databases and current journal publications.  Students will gain a broad exposure to the tax implications of business decisions ranging from corporate formation to corporate acquisitions and divestitures. Students will also be introduced to how tax planning decisions affect financial metrics.  This course is cross listed with ACC524. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. (3 credits)
  
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    MBA 527 Managerial Accounting: Strategy and Control



    Concepts, techniques, and uses of accounting in managerial decision making and problem solving. Includes objectives and limitations of an accounting system and interrelationships between that system and other administrative functions, interpretation of accounting reports, and direct costing and contribution approach in terms of both responsibility and decision accounting. (3 credits)
  
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    MBA 531 Strategic Marketing



    Strategies and approaches to decision making in the aggregate marketing system. Includes analytical marketing tools used in policy-making areas of organization, research, product, promotion, pricing, distribution, forecasting, and management of sales force. (3 credits)
  
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    MBA 538 Controllership Issues



    This course will provide a comprehensive overview of the roles and responsibilities of controllers in today’s corporate environment. Students will learn the controller’s role in facilitating investor relationships, internal control, profit planning, cost control, external financial reporting, and best practices in long range and short-term planning. The course will address internal managerial reporting, external financial reporting, and governmental tax reporting as well as the relationship between the function of the controller and other corporate executive functions.  This course is cross listed with ACC538. Prerequisite: MBA 527   (3 credits)
  
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    MBA 545 Applied Operations Management



    This course is designed to help students develop a deeper understanding of the conversion process by which organizations transform raw materials into finished goods or services.  Included topics (operations strategy, as well as process, capacity, inventory, and project management) provide students with the ability to describe and understand, measure and analyze, and develop plans for changing the operating processes within a department/organization.  The subject is approached from an interdisciplinary perspective, useful to managers in all phases of the business.  Classroom efforts focus on case studies, simulations, and self-reflection on how concepts learned might be applied within the student’s organization. (3 credits)
  
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    MBA 546 Optimizing Supply Chains:



    The objective of this course is to prepare students to apply quantitative methods to effectively design and manage supply chain operations. The course covers all phases of material management in both manufacturing and service organizations. Students will analyze the relationship between supply chain design and performance and develop the skills to support their decisions analytically. Topics covered include: Supply chain performance, facility location, forecasting, inventory, sourcing, transportation, and coordination. Prerequisite: Completion of MBA 512 . (3 credits)
  
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    MBA 552 Accounting Information Systems



    This course investigates and analyzes the role of accounting information systems (AIS) within companiesʼ operating environments. Emphasis is placed upon internal controls, current technology (including databases), application of AIS, and AIS auditing techniques.  This course is cross listed with ACC552. Prerequisite: MBA 527   (3 credits)
  
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    MBA 553 Vertical Marketing Channel Decisions and Optimization



    The student will study the origins of channel strategy from Plato’s Republic to its evolution to today’s realities of Internet exchange and a global marketplace. Students will design and evaluate vertical marketing channel systems to meet the needs of the market. Students will explore the role of channel members in the delivery of product, information, logistics, and revenue flow. Students will also develop an understanding and appreciation for the role channel strategy plays in achieving a competitive advantage. Prerequisite: MBA 531  (3 credits)
  
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    MBA 554 Human Resource Management



    This course is designed to facilitate an understanding of how human resource systems are developed and maintained within organizations. Special emphasis is placed on understanding the legal environment (both legislative and judicial) of the employment relationship in areas such as equal employment opportunity, compensation, and safety. Specific systems covered in-depth include: recruitment, selection, training, performance appraisal, compensation and benefits, discipline, and employee health. Throughout the course, specific attention will be given to the importance of ethics, employee rights, and social responsibility in human resource decisions. (3 credits)
  
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    MBA 555 Health Care Policy, Organization and Finance



    This course is an examination of the effects of health policy on the economic and financial performance of the health care system.  Perspectives that will be considered throughout the course include those of insurance companies, institutional providers, medical care providers, and patients.  The course will be conducted with an emphasis on the evolving health care system, drawing on the experiences of the instructor(s) and students alike. Prerequisite: MBA 512  and MBA 514   (3 credits)
  
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    MBA 556 Executive Leadership



    This course is designed to review and analyze the major traditional and nontraditional theories that have developed in the field of management. This course will also examine current challenges and problems that managers face and how theories can be applied in improving effectiveness, efficiency, and general performance. Topics such as leadership, change, downsizing, re-engineering, diversity, technology and innovation, and teamwork will be discussed. Case analysis, experiential exercises, and readings will supplement the course work. (3 credits)
  
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    MBA 558 Buyer Behavior



    The student taking this course will examine customer behavior from the standpoint of the marketing manager. The course covers consumer learning, consumer perception, and consumer motivation and how they shape and influence the marketing process. This course gives special attention to models of buyer behavior and their use in the making of strategic and tactical marketing decisions. (3 credits)
  
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    MBA 562 Financial Statement Analysis



    An intensive study of financial statement analysis, with emphasis on description and explanation of the demand and supply forces underlying the provision of financial statement data, properties of the numbers derived from financial statements, key aspects of decisions that use financial statement information, and features of the environment in which these decisions are made.  This course is cross listed with ACC562. Prerequisite: MBA 527   (3 credits)
  
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    MBA 565 Population Health



    This course is an examination of the evolution of the United States Health care system toward balance among quality, cost, and access. Focusing on the trend toward assessing and managing the health of a population the course will probe political, operational, and technical aspects of managed care. 3 credit hours
  
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    MBA 566 International Business



    An overview of how the global business environment impacts decision-making and planning within the multi-national firm. Topics include: economic reasons for global trade, environmental factors that impact decision making (economic, cultural, political, legal), foreign market penetration strategies, and international considerations in a variety of business areas (finance, organizational design, staffing, marketing, strategic planning). (3 credits)
  
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    MBA 568 Promotional Strategy Management



    The student taking this course will examine promotional strategy from the standpoint of the marketing manager. The course covers the absolute and synergistic impacts of combinations of advertising, publicity, personal selling, and sales promotion. Special attention is given to the concerns of budgeting, planning, targeting, implementing, and evaluating promotional strategies under conditions of uncertainty. (3 credits)
  
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    MBA 572 Corporate Finance



    Analytical approach to the management of financial resources and the selection of financing alternatives. Includes working capital, capital budget management, and the analysis of alternative investments and short- to long-range sources of financing.  This course is cross listed with ACC572. (3 credits)
  
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    MBA 573 Strategic Brand Management



    This course is designed to give students the skills needed to create and assess brand image and product positioning. Students will learn how to make branding decisions for business-to-business and consumer marketing strategies. This course will offer a perspective on the creation of brand equity and the management of brands through the product life cycle. The course will explore the process of measuring and interpreting brand performance and to establish the value of a brand strategy. Prerequisite: MBA 531  (3 credits)
  
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    MBA 577 Project Management



    Project Management is an important function, as projects drive progress and change and help organizations strategically respond to economic and market demands.  A mature project management environment is key for industries and organizations worldwide.  Students will learn how to mange a broad range of activities within an organization based on the Project Management Body of Knowledge (PMBOK).  Students will study and apply the full life cycle perspective of managing a project which includes initiating, planning, executing, monitoring and controlling, and closing.  Key topics covered include project integration, scope, schedule, cost, quality, resources, communications, risk management, procurement and stakeholder management. (3 credits)
  
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    MBA 578 Marketing Information and Research



    The student taking this course will examine marketing research from the standpoint of the marketing manager. The course covers techniques for soliciting, compiling, evaluating, and interpreting the information necessary to make marketing decisions. This course gives special attention to problems in data collection, questionnaire construction, and experimental design. (3 credits)
  
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    MBA 582 Investments



    This course examines securities markets, the different classes of securities, and the importance of portfolio management. Various assets are discussed, including bonds, options, futures contracts, and foreign currencies, but the course emphasis is on common stocks and the stock market. A major goal of the course is to show students methods for obtaining optimal portfolio allocation. (3 credits)
  
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    MBA 585 Health Systems Development



    This course is intended to orient the health care practitioner to salient issues in health care system development given current trends in market maturation.  The course considers issues at the system, organization, group, and individual levels. (3 credits)
  
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    MBA 586 Continuous Improvement and Lean Systems Development



    A successful Lean effort has a significant impact on an organization’s performance. This course discusses how lean methodologies can improve organizational efficiency and effectiveness. The focus of the course is on the application of lean tools in service and manufacturing settings. Students will manage a continuous improvement project as part of the course requirement. Topics include: 5S, point of use storage (POUS), standardized work, single minute exchange of die (SMED), Kaizen, value stream mapping, level loading, and Kanban. The class may include plant tours. (3 credits)
  
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    MBA 588 Digital Marketing Strategy



    This course builds on existing marketing knowledge, focusing on how to integrate digital marketing platforms into new and existing marketing campaigns.  Students are exposed to how businesses use the internet, social media, mobile technologies, and search to build customer acquisition, retention, and conversion strategies.  Primary emphasis is placed on the consultative nature of marketing and the use of internet-based technologies including, but not limited to, website development, blogs, email marketing, video marketing, and social media, to communicate with target audiences, deepen relationships with online customers, and ultimately promote products and services.  Students will have a solid foundation in the customer segmentation, branding, promotion, and advertising methods marketing professionals employ for long-term, organizational growth. (3 credits)
  
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    MBA 591 Six Sigma and Quality Management



    The course is an introduction to Six Sigma and Quality Management. The emphasis of the course is on the application of Six Sigma. In particular, students will complete a Six Sigma project as part of the course requirement. The course requirements include those of a standard Six Sigma Black Belt program. Topics covered in the course include: history of quality management, problem solving techniques, voice of the customer, design for Six Sigma, statistical techniques, and project management. The class may include plant tours. Prerequisite:   (3 credits)
  
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    MBA 592 Financial Planning



    This course is a study of the five areas of financial planning. Students will examine the fundamentals of investments planning, insurance planning, retirement planning, estate planning, and income tax planning.  Important topics include mutual fund and real estate investments; home, life, and auto insurance contracts; pension plans; wills and trusts; and retirement management.  Each topic includes an emphasis on risk management.  A major goal of the course is for students to develop their own personal financial plan. Prerequisite:    (3 credits)
  
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    MBA 593 Business Strategy



    From the broad perspective of general management, this course develops an understanding of the formulation and implementation of strategies and policies within the current global environment. Special emphasis is placed on how firms are establishing successful global strategies. This is a capstone course that will require the integration of material from other courses. Business Strategy should be completed in the final 2 semesters of enrollment prior to degree completion. Prerequisite: 18 credits of 510-level or above coursework including   , MBA 527 , MBA 545 , and MBA 572 . (3 credits)
  
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    MBA 594 International Finance



    This course examines the global component of financial studies, with particular emphasis on identifying, measuring, and managing foreign exchange exposure. Topics include financing the international firm, making foreign investment decisions, understanding the international monetary system. Special emphasis will be given to global derivatives and their uses as hedging instruments for the international firm. Prerequisite: MBA 572  (3 credits)
  
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    MBA 598 Directed Study



    Research in fields of special interest of supervised study covering areas not specifically included in the curriculum. Completed under the direction of a faculty member with prior consent of the MBA Committee. (3 credits)
  
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    MBA 599 Directed Study



    Research in fields of special interest of supervised study covering areas not specifically included in the curriculum. Completed under the direction of a faculty member with prior consent of the MBA Committee. (3 credits)

Master of Education

  
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    MED 500 Continuous Enrollment



    Students must register for this zero credit status when not registering for any credit bearing course(s). The Continuous Enrollment status ensures that the student does not lose their matriculation for that semester.  See Continuous Enrollment Policy for further important information. (0 credits)
  
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    MED 501 Introduction to Educational Research



    This course will facilitate the development of knowledge and skills to read, design, and interpret research, especially as that research relates to educational issues. Students will, through actual qualitative and quantitative research activities, identify and develop sound research questions, select appropriate research techniques, develop solid research design, and engage in analysis of data. Students will, as a result of this course, be informed professional consumers and practitioners of research and will be able to utilize quantitative and qualitative research for effective educational improvement. (3 credits)
  
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    MED 502 Development, Learning, and Inclusive Practice



    Students will expand their knowledge of effective educational practices, development, behavior, and inclusive practices.  They will apply their expanded understandings of these topics while interacting with school-based special education professionals in a variety of leadership roles.  Throughout the course, participants will explore emerging models of development while reflecting on their personal leadership characteristics and their roles in creating cultures of inclusivity and presumed competency for all learners.  The culminating activity will require students to develop their personal missions, visions and core values as formal or informal school leaders with a focus on inclusive practices. (3 credits)
  
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    MED 503 Curriculum Trends and Issues



    Students will analyze significant trends and issues impacting curricular decisions, trace their historical development, and examine likely future trends. Issues to be examined include conflicts between and among educational philosophies, learning theory, content, inclusion practices, and purpose of the written curriculum. Further public expectations, legislative decisions, and policymaking will be examined to better understand the many facets of a schoolʼs curriculum process. (3 credits)
  
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    MED 504 Group Processes in Education



    This course will advance participant understanding of the various concepts of group processes, including communications within groups, leadership, decision making, conflict, change, school culture, power and team development. Theory and practice are combined in this course through the use of reflection tools and participation in simulated group processes. The development and maintenance of effective school cultures will be emphasized. (3 credits)
  
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    MED 510 Foundations of Reading Instruction



    This course is designed to examine the nature of language, acquisition of language, and ways in which language develops. The pedagogy of reading instruction, particularly the nature of the reading process, skill development, and various instructional strategies will be emphasized. Students will examine historical practices as well as current models of reading instruction. (3 credits)
  
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    MED 511 Children and Adolescent Literature



    This course is an advanced survey of childrenʼs and adolescent literature. Included will be the examination of the genres of literature, the literary elements that combine to create a good book, and how literature can be used in any classroom. Students will learn advanced strategies for teaching literature as a teaching medium – one that enhances and expands the lesson or instructional concept. The course will also emphasize the strategies and techniques teachers use to promote literature within and throughout every subject area. (3 credits)
  
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    MED 512 Advanced Reading in the Content Areas



    This course is designed for reading specialists and elementary teachers. It examines the relationship between reading skills and student achievement in content area subjects and the processes that foster independent learners. Research-based teaching techniques and procedures geared to developing critical thinking skills are emphasized. (3 credits)
  
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    MED 513 Development and Administration of School Reading Programs



    This course defines the various reading specializations along with the duties and responsibilities of reading specialists. Students will examine current theories and practices on the development and administration of school reading programs, especially those suitable for specific school situations. Additionally, the course will enable students to monitor and assess the effectiveness of a school or district reading program in line with current standards and/or regulations. (3 credits)
  
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    MED 520 Advanced Psychology of Reading



    This course examines the psychological principles involved in the perception and recognition of words and word groups, theories of lexical access, visual perception of print, integration of sensory systems, neural mechanism for integrating language and print, and the cognitive dimensions of the reading act. Psychological basis for theories regarding preferred methods of teaching reading will be examined. (3 credits)
  
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    MED 524 The Reading Specialist as Literacy Coach



    This course defines the emerging role of the literacy coach and explores the duties and responsibilities of a coach. Students will examine current theories and practices of effective literacy coaching and datadriven instruction. Additionally, the course will enable students to apply their knowledge of instructional leadership and best literacy practices with effective coaching techniques to expand teachersʼ instructional expertise and ultimately impact student achievement. (3 credits)
  
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    MED 526 Clinical Practicum in Reading: Diagnosis and Assessment



    This course is designed to give practice in the use of formal and informal assessments in appraising a childʼs skill in reading and related areas.The utilization of a reading profile or case study that serves as the basis for instructional practices is emphasized. Clinical and field experiences are part of this course. (3 credits)
  
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    MED 527 Clinical Practicum in Reading: Correction and Remediation



    In this course, teachers work in teams designing corrective and remedial instructional plans for students with mild to severe reading disabilities, according to their emotional, cultural, and educational learning needs. It involves supervised practice in the use of sociological, psychological, and pedagogical instructional procedures including: keeping student portfolios, collaborating with related support school personnel, conferring with parents, using community resources, and conducting classroom action research. (3 credits)
  
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    MED 550 Legal and Ethical Issues in Education for Administrators



    This course will guide the aspiring principal through the morass of legal and ethical issues that need to be considered in the day-to-day leadership of the school. Students will engage in an analysis, synthesis, and application of judicial interpretations of the various constitutions, statues, rules, and regulations relating to education. Those legal considerations affecting the rights of educators, students, and parents will be investigated. Through the active application of case law, and following the tenants of ethical leadership, students will acquire the skills necessary to promote the success of students while working within a framework of appropriate laws, policies, and regulations. (3 credits)
  
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    MED 560 The Principalship



    Students will consider the key issues of the school organization, pupil promotion, program of studies, selection and supervision of teaching staff, oversight of pupil personnel, contract management, time allocation, plant and equipment management, and public relations. Theoretical and “best practice” models will be explored. Students will participate in a number of school-based administration activities through a supervised school-based practicum. Major problems of the organization and administration of schools will be examined. (3 credits)
  
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    MED 561 Introduction to Organizational Leadership



    A variety of theories and models of organization and administration with specific applicability to schools will be explored. The school organization will be analyzed through the symbolic, structural human resource and political conceptual frames. Leadership styles, systems theory, and various administrative practices will be addressed. Theoretical and conceptual constructs will be applied through the use of authentic and case study applications. (3 credits)
  
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    MED 562 Supervision of Instruction



    This course extends the principalʼs knowledge and skill in applying clinical techniques to instructional supervision. An overview of personnel practices and the evaluation of school personnel will be investigated. Systems for analyzing teaching performance are explored, and methods to engage teachers in their own professional reflective practice and renewal for improvement will be developed. Clinical supervision and mentoring models will be emphasized. Techniques and processes for analyzing student assessment and performance outcomes against state standards will be developed. (3 credits)
  
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    MED 565 School Financial Management



    This course provides an overview of planning and fiscal management models and tools appropriate for public school management. Specifically, it is designed to help future administrators understand the legal and philosophical issues associated with school finance and business operations. Federal, state, and local school financing; school budgets; and business methods of accounting will be addressed. Students will engage in simulated financial planning and management activities, as well as participate in a school financial planning/management process. (3 credits)
  
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    MED 572 Supervision of Educational Personnel



    This course examines an adult development model and highlights opportunities to enhance the professional skills of all school employees. Adult learning theories and models will be explored as they relate to current best practice regarding the supervision, development, and improvement of teachers and other school personnel. Models for curriculum improvement will be examined. (3 credits)
  
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    MED 580 Structural Inequity in Education

    Fall-Spring-Summer Semesters

    Candidates will be invited to critically reflect on the structural inequities inherent in the American education system.  This will originate with an investigation of critical theory and a close reading of foundational texts explaining the historical context educational inequity.  Candidates will also explore student conditions in uniquely inequitable systems, with special attention paid to urban education.  Candidates will synthesize critical theory with their personal experiences in education.  Candidates will learn a variety of techniques and will design curricular products that are informed by their understandings of educational inequity. 3 credit hours
  
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    MED 582 Education Policy and Reform

    Fall-Spring-Summer Semesters

    Candidates will investigate the economic, historical, political and sociological factors that contribute to the current state of American school systems.  This investigation will begin with broad national trends including school re-segregation and social stratification, school choice, privatization, and teacher evaluation.  Candidates will then explore the effects of those national trends on the urban education systems in which they live and work.  Candidates will be challenged to identify opportunities to affect change by participating in the policy dialog surrounding urban education. 3 credit hours
  
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    MED 584 Mental Health Literacy for Educators

    Fall-Spring-Summer Semesters

    Candidates will explore the range of mental health factors that can influence students’ school experiences in school systems.  These can include adverse childhood experiences, trauma, and mental illness.  Candidates will also develop enhanced understandings of social-emotional learning while learning to comply with state and federal statutes governing ethical practice for responding to students’ social and emotional needs. 3 credit hours
  
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    MED 586 Social and Cultural Responsiveness in the Classroom

    Fall-Spring-Summer Semesters

    Candidates will explore a range of socioeconomic and cultural backgrounds found among students in today’s schools.  Candidates will evaluate their personal socioeconomic and cultural experiences and perceptions and evaluate how those experiences and perceptions influence their professional practice.  Candidates will explore frameworks for social-emotional approaches to teaching and will apply them in classroom products and performances. 3 credit hours
  
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    MED 588 Supporting Student Social and Emotional Needs

    Fall-Spring-Summer Semesters

    Candidates will develop the skills needed to deploy social and emotional learning approaches with students in classroom settings.  This will include helping them build and maintain healthy and positive relationships, setting realistic and positive goals, and empathy-building.  Candidates will explore advanced topics in childhood development, positive behavioral support, multi-tiered systems of support, and positive behavioral intervention.  Candidates will also develop approaches for interacting with students who endure specific forms of trauma, loss, and self harm behavior. 3 credit hours
  
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    MED 590 School and Community Collaboration for Resilience

    Fall - Spring - Summer Semesters

    Candidates will explore evidence-based approaches for school-community collaboration.  These approaches will be augmented by a deep investigation of the full range of community organizations and their services available in candidates’ educational communities.  Participants will learn appropriate and social and emotionally responsive approaches for engaging in their communities and will explore approaches for developing school-community partnerships and programs in ways that support students who experience mental illness and/or adverse childhood experiences. 3 credit hours
  
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    MED 592 Research Seminar in Diversity and Resilience

    Fall-Spring-Summer Semesters

    Candidates will develop a writing product on a topic in diversity and/or student resilience.  This product will synthesize candidates’ understandings of diversity and student resilience theory, social and cultural competence, community engagement, responding to non-academic factors that contribute to student learning, and/or deploying social and emotional approaches to student learning.  The product will either be a piece of novel scholarship or an evidence-based program proposal.  Candidates will complete a variety of formative writing activities and deliver a capstone presentation summarizing their work. 3 credit hours
  
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    MED 594 Administrative Internship



    This supervised pre-professional internship is the culminating experience in the Educational Leadership program. It provides candidates with field-based opportunities to apply the knowledge, dispositions, and competencies acquired through the programʼs course work. The internship is aligned to both the PA Inspired Leadership (PIL) standards and the Interstate Leaders Licensure Consortium (ISLLC) standards. The internship is required for all Educational Leadership candidates. (3 credits)
  
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    MED 595 Administrative Internship I



    This optional internship format is designed for the aspiring principal whose professional and/or family responsibilities make completing a one-semester internship experience very difficult. This supervised preprofessional internship is the culminating experience in the Educational Leadership program. It provides candidates with field-based opportunities to apply the knowledge, dispositions, and competencies acquired through the programʼs course work. The internship is aligned to both the PA Inspired Leadership (PIL) standards and the Interstate Leaders Licensure Consortium (ISLLC) standards. The internship is required for all Educational Leadership candidates. (2 credits each semester)
  
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    MED 596 Administrative Internship II



    This optional internship format is designed for the aspiring principal whose professional and/or family responsibilities make completing a one-semester internship experience very difficult. This supervised preprofessional internship is the culminating experience in the Educational Leadership program. It provides candidates with field-based opportunities to apply the knowledge, dispositions, and competencies acquired through the programʼs course work. The internship is aligned to both the PA Inspired Leadership (PIL) standards and the Interstate Leaders Licensure Consortium (ISLLC) standards. The internship is required for all Educational Leadership candidates. (2 credits each semester)
  
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    MED 600 Special Education Processes and Procedures



    This course provides an in-depth review of the philosophical, historical, and legal foundations of special education.  The graduate student will learn about the unique cognitive development of children with disabilities including how students with disabilities acquire and process information, and problem solve.  Students will apply concepts of human development and recognize how to plan and implement effective instruction in a standards-aligned education system.  Students will learn the federal and legal mandates for serving students with disabilities and the implications of mandates on the program models and service delivery.  Effective strategies for collaboration, consultation, and advocacy will be addressed. (3 credits)
  
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    MED 601 Educational Assessment of Students with Disabilities



    The course is organized around three major themes: measurement concepts, evaluation of student performance and assessment of basic skills and content knowledge. Assessment, diagnosis, and writing and implementation of progress monitoring will be examined.  Norm-referenced, criterion-referenced and individually referenced assessments will be examined and evaluated as to their relevance for different instructional purposes. Specifically, this course is designed to examine approaches for the academic and social assessment of students with disabilities including diagnostic principles and procedures.  Students will analyze informal and formal assessment tools and procedures and apply diagnostic information to plan instruction. Special emphasis will be given to progress monitoring procedures and techniques including curriculum based measurement. This course also provides an overview of basic principles of formal and informal assessments that are commonly encountered by teachers in educational settings. The first part of this course focuses on, validity, reliability, measures of central tendency and variation as well as test development with the goal of providing a basis for understanding specific test data and materials. The second part of the course addresses specific measures of assessment such as the Wechsler’s Intelligence scale, Woodcock Johnson, Key Math Test, and curriculum based assessment. Prerequisite:   (3 credits)
  
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    MED 602 Effective Instructional Methods



    The graduate student will build on their understanding of the unique cognitive development of children with disabilities including and will apply assessment data and instructional knowledge in order to implement effective instructional strategies in a standards aligned educational system.  Students will apply the learning models of intervention in place within the learning community and the teacher’s role in addressing learning and behavior problems within the regular classroom.  Students will learn effective strategies for inclusive settings that involve collaboration and cooperation between educations, consultants, parents, related service providers, and IEP teams. Prerequisite:   (3 credits)
  
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    MED 603 Literacy Development and Instruction in Core and Intervention Area Including Inclusive Practices



    This course focuses on the following major topics:  a conceptual understanding of the components of reading, phonological awareness and phonics, vocabulary, and text comprehension and identifies how these areas pose challenges for students with disabilities.  Students will articulate and model the use of assessment and research based explicit and systematic instruction in the teaching of literacy both reading and writing to students with disabilities.  Students will demonstrate efficient differentiated instruction and an understanding of efficient assessment, planning, coordination and delivery for effective instruction in inclusive settings. Prerequisite:   (3 credits)
  
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    MED 604 Evidence Based Effective Instruction for Students with High Incidence Disabilities



    This course will address the historical foundations of educating children with mild disability (learning disabilities, mild mental retardation, emotional disturbance), definitions, etiology, characteristics, assessment, educational approaches and designing specific educational interventions.  Particular focus will be on developing literacy skills including reading, writing, listening and speaking as delineated in the Pennsylvania Academic Standards using elements of effective instruction.  It also focuses on identification of types, characteristics, etiology and assessment of students grades N-12 who are mentally retarded.  The course includes selected models of instruction, the role of paraprofessionals, rights and legal issues, development and psychosocial aspects, as well as family considerations. Prerequisite:   (3 credits)
  
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    MED 606 Evidence Based Effective Instruction for Students with Low Incidence Disabilities



    This course will provide a comprehensive review of curricula and address program and curriculum development for students who have severe disabilities (Autism, significant intellectual disabilities, multiple disabilities, vision and hearing impairment, etc.).  Topics include development of programs in functional academics, home living, social interaction, language and communication, leisure, community based instruction and vocational training.  The issue of generalization of learned skills into real world environment will be presented.  Includes practicum experiences, general education classrooms. Prerequisite:   (3 credits)
  
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    MED 607 Assistive and Augmentative Technology: Universial Design to Support Standards Aligned Areas of Instruction



    This course provides prospective special education teachers with an overview of assistive devices that can be implemented in classroom settings for individuals N-8 with communication deficits, visual and hearing impairments, physical challenges, and mild learning impairments.  Emphasis is placed on evaluating the needs of students who are challenged and in selecting the appropriate technology that will bypass or reduce the disability in the classroom.  Students are provided with resources on current devices and are given opportunities to examine and operate actual devices that they may encounter in the classroom. Prerequisite:   (3 credits)
  
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    MED 608 Positive Behavior Support



    This course examines several theoretical models of behavior management with a focus on a) maximizing appropriate communication and interactions by students with challenging behaviors, b) maintaining a safe psychological and physical classroom environment, c) assessing and analyzing the functions of behavior, and d) designing individualized, class-wide, and school-wide behavior management plans. Prerequisite:   (3 credits)
  
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    MED 609 Professional Practicum



    This course parallels the SPE student teaching experience and provides a weekly opportunity for collegial interaction.  Selected topics in the field of special education of significance for the student teacher are explored during this course.  There are also provisions for sharing and discussion of individual concerns, questions and experiences.  This course provides a structure for specific administrative necessities of student teaching, the certification process, and pre-employment preparation. Prerequisite:   (1 credit)
  
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    MED 610 Student Teaching



    Under the supervision of college and cooperating teacher staff, the student majoring in Special Education Certification Program engages in on-site planning, teaching, and evaluating classroom learning activities in an elementary/middle school and special education settings.  Focus will be on the integration of all aspects of the practicum as an integral part of this course.  Two seven and a half week experiences will be in an elementary childhood/middle school (PreK-8) classroom and a special education classroom. Prerequisite: Admission to the Student Teaching Semester and   (3 credits)
  
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    MED 620 Technology-Enhanced Pedagogies



    Students will be introduced to both education technology integration theories and pedagogical applications of contemporary education technologies. Theories addressed during this course include the Technological Pedagogical Content Knowledge (TPACK) Model, the Substitution Augmentation, Modification and Redefinition Model (SAMR), and Technology Self-efficacy Models. Students will apply these theories during explorations of various synchronous and asynchronous pedagogy-enhancing technologies including learning management systems, collaboration tools, and content-presentation systems. (3 credits)
  
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    MED 622 Distance Enabling Education Technologies



    Students will learn evidence-supported practices for employing distance-enabling technologies in education settings. Students will apply these practices while learning to use asynchronous distance enabling technologies including virtual learning networks, digital interactives, and learning managements systems as well as synchronous distance education technologies including live streaming and virtual collaboration. Students will also explore the legal and ethical implications of distance learning as well as techniques to differentiate instruction for diverse learners while employing distance-enabling technologies. (3 credits)
  
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    MED 624 Media and Application Design and Development



    Students will learn classic principals of design and apply them while learning to author education media. Media products created during this course include the development of web-streaming video, online digital interactives, and mobile application solutions. Students will also learn the principals of the Universal Design for learning and employ them to identify pre-existing education media and/or design novel education media to accommodate the diverse range of learning needs in school settings. (3 credits)
  
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    MED 626 Education Technology Leadership



    Students learn the skills required to succeed in education technology leadership positions in school organizations. Students will learn how to facilitate the development of institutional cultures that promote collective growth and development using emerging education technologies. Products created in association with these learning goals include technology needs assessment plans, implementation plans, professional development and training seminars, and/or grant applications. Students will participate in a capstone field experience during which they will employ their leadership product in their affiliated educational organization. This performance will be the equivalent of 40 hours of field experience practicum as defined by PDE for Education Technology, M.Ed. track students pursuing the Instructional Technology Specialist Certification. (3 credits)
  
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    MED 628 Education Technology Curriculum and Systems



    Students learn to support technology in various types of education curriculum through the management of education technology systems. Issues to be examined include managing programs, technology assets, and personnel. Students will also explore the use of multiple-author and cloud-based solutions to curriculum development and application, organization of physical spaces and technology hardware for optimal learning, systems for ensuring ubiquitous access to technology tools and applications across a variety of platforms, and ensuring safe access to the internet in large organizations. Products created in association with these learning goals include the design of education-technology learning spaces, the development of acceptable use policies, and/or technology access plans. (3 credits)
  
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    MED 630 Research Seminar in Educational Technology



    Students will design a research project meant to evaluate the outcomes of an education technology intervention.  Students will select a technology-supported pedagogy or initiative occurring at their affiliated educational organization, prepare a literature review, develop research question(s), develop a research protocol, select or develop instrument(s), and prepare an Internal Review Board (IRB) proposal.  This performance will be the equivalent of 35 hours of field experience practicum as defined by PDE for Education Technology, M.Ed. track students pursuing the Instructional Technology Specialist Certification.   3 credit hours
  
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    MED 632 Education Technology Internship



    This supervised internship is a culminating experience in the education technology program for students seeking either the Instructional Technology Certificate or the Online Teaching Endorsement from the Pennsylvania Department of Education. It provides candidates with field-based opportunities to apply the knowledge, dispositions, and competencies acquired during education technology program coursework. The internship is aligned to both the Instructional Technology Specialist Certification and Online teaching Endorsement competencies. The internship is required for all Educational Leadership candidates. (3 credits)
  
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    THE 506 Theatre History: The Well-Made Play & Beyond

    Fall-Spring-Summer Semesters

    Students will use major dramatic texts to explore theatrical history and how theatre is a mirror of current society and issues (IV A; IV C; IV D).  Students will read plays, discuss playwrights and staged productions, and examine the historical, social and critical contexts of the period (IVB-D).  Class discussions will emphasize how to convey this information to young learners (I C).  At the conclusion of the course, the students should be able to:  Identify and discuss major plays and playwrights, (II B) Identify conventions in modern & contemporary drama and performance, and Critically analyze dramatic literature (IV A-D). 3 credit hours
  
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    THE 507 Performance History and Craft

    Fall-Spring-Summer Semesters

    Students will learn the history of acting and directing through the study of practitioners with an emphasis on theory and production history (I A; II B; IV D).  Students will discuss the stages of play creation from auditions to rehearsal processes to the final staged production using historical examples and current work to support their arguments (I A3; I B; II B; IV B). 3 credit hours
  
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    THE 508 Theatre Production and Design (Summer Residency)

    Summer Semester

    This course focuses on:  ensemble-building; new play development; and the collaborative relationship in the rehearsal room (I A1; II A2; II B).  Students will work as actors, directors and playwrights using contemporary devising methods and improvisation to  create a dramatic text to be performed in residency (I A4; II A; III A).  This course is part of a 10 day on-campus residency where students will be expected to work during morning, afternoon and evening.  Candidates who cannot commute will be offered on-campus room and board for the duration of the residency.  This course will be supplemented with theatre-related co-curricular activities through the duration of the residency. 3 credit hours
 

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