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    York College of Pennsylvania
   
 
  Sep 21, 2017
 
 
    
2015-2016 Undergraduate Catalog [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Degree Requirements



Introduction

York College is dedicated to serving the needs of its students by providing a quality learning experience that prepares graduates for productive roles in society. At York, we believe the collegiate experience for students should both facilitate intellectual and personal growth, and encourage the development of lifelong learning skills. In support of this philosophy, the College offers a program of studies that provides over 50 degree options in baccalaureate disciplines, plus associate degree and minor programs.

For students pursuing a program of study at York College, the catalog is the official guide to the academic standards, policies, and procedures of the institution. It provides essential information and should be used regularly in working with the student’s academic advisor. While academic advisors and other staff make every effort to be conscientious and informed, the student has a personal responsibility for ensuring that all graduation standards and requirements will be met during their program of study.

The information contained in this catalog applies to individuals entering York College of Pennsylvania in the academic years for which the general catalog is dated. The material in the Academic Standards section clarifies the academic standards, policies, and procedures in effect at the time of publication. Admission to and attendance at the College are conditional upon compliance with these regulations. Additional information regarding academic matters is available through the Academic Affairs Office, the Academic Advising Center, the Registrar’s Office, and the Records Office.

Students are required to complete the program of study as outlined in the catalog in effect at the time of their admission to that program of study. Although this catalog was prepared on the basis of the best information available at the time of publication, the College reserves the right to change any provisions, regulations, or requirements set forth within, without notice or obligation.

Baccalaureate Degree Requirements

Specific requirements and recommended curricula for each baccalaureate degree program are described in the Programs of Study  section of this catalog. The general requirements for earning a baccalaureate degree at York College, which apply to all departmental bachelor’s degree programs, are:

  1. Successful completion of at least 120 credit hours and matriculation in a specific academic program. To satisfy the College’s residence requirement, the last 30 of these credits must be earned at York College.
  2. Achievement of a cumulative grade point average of 2.0 or higher. In certain majors, a higher minimum grade point average may be required for degree completion.
  3. Successful completion of the designated program requirements for a specific major and achievement of the appropriate grade point average in the major as specified by the departmental curriculum in the Programs of Study  section of this catalog.
  4. Completion of the Generation Next Requirements for baccalaureate majors and achievement of the appropriate grade point average in these courses as specified in the Generation Next Requirements section below.
  5. Students completing a second York College Baccalaureate Degree are not required to repeat the general education requirements.

Associate Degree Requirements

Specific requirements and recommended curricula for each degree program are described in the Programs of Study  section of this catalog. The general requirements for earning an associate degree at York College, which apply to all departmental associate degree programs, are:

  1. Successful completion of at least 60 credit hours and matriculation in a specific academic program. To satisfy the College’s residency requirement, the last 30 of these 60 credits must be earned at York College.
  2. Achievement of a cumulative grade point average of 2.0 or higher. In some associate degree majors, a higher minimum grade point average may be required for degree completion.
  3. Successful completion of the designated program requirements of a specific major and achievement of the appropriate grade point average in designated courses in the major as specified by the departmental curriculum in the Programs of Study  section of this catalog.
  4. Completion of the Generation Next Requirements for associate degree majors and achievement of the appropriate grade point average in these courses as specified in the Generation Next Requirements information below.
  5. Students completing an Associate degree are not required to complete a Constellation.

Generation Next General Education Requirements

Generation Next is built upon the tradition of a liberal arts education as the basis for preparing students for personal, civic, and professional challenges in the 21st century. The system of Elements and multi-disciplinary and interdisciplinary certified courses work with and enrich Major program offerings so that all students, regardless of Major, may achieve learning outcomes in Critical and Analytical Thinking, Creative and Interdisciplinary Thinking, Quantitative Fluency, Oral/Written/Visual Communication, Citizenship and Intercultural Competency, and Academic and Professional Standards. Student learning in the general education program will be facilitated by rigorous curricular and co-curricular experiences and opportunities.

Generation Next creates a system of courses that allow you to explore personal interests, as well as enhance and strengthen skills and abilities valued by your major, as well as employers. A great education, an education that can really take you places, is interconnected across many disciplines. So we want you to graduate with more than just an intense knowledge of your major area.  We want you to get the benefit of knowing multiple academic areas. This knowledge will make you well-rounded and help you become a a more attractive and competitive job candidate.

Generation Next Policies:

(Please Note: Students matriculated before fall 2015 MUST stay with the Core/ADR/Electives system, even if they change their major.)

  • The First Year Seminar and the Foundations courses must be completed with a minimum grade of 2.
  • Students who enter the college with 30 credits hours transferred in will not take a First Year Seminar, and therefore must take an additional 3 credits for graduation.
  • Transfer students that are awarded 60 or more credits upon acceptance to York College will not be required to complete a Constellation.
  • Students should complete their First Year Seminar during their first Fall semester. It should be completed by the time a student as earned 45 credits.
  • Students are recommended to complete their Foundations courses and Disciplinary Perspectives courses before beginning Constellation course work.
  • No courses in any of the General Education elements (First Year Seminar, Foundations, Disciplinary Perspectives, Constellation) may be taken on a pass/fail basis.
  • Students must declare a Constellation as a Concentration by the time they have reached 60 credits.

Generation Next Elements:

The purpose of the First Year Seminar (FYS) is to prepare new students for the creative, interdisciplinary, and rigorous modes of inquiry that characterize a York College education as is expected in major and non-major (general education) courses.  The FYS is intended to create a sense of intellectual community for students and faculty, to emphasize attainment of key learning outcomes, to introduce students to college-level rigor and expectations, to encourage the academic growth of students, and to purposefully expose students to a variety of co-curricular experiences and resources available at York College. Courses include:
FYS 100 First-Year Seminar  
FYS 110 (EDU200) Education in Today’s Society  (This course is designed for all education majors.)

Foundations courses are meant to serve as the initial building block for student learning. This is where you start building the skills that will be the basis of what you learn throughout college and beyond. Students will take Foundations courses in the following areas:

Disciplinary Perspectives courses: These courses demonstrate the ways that knowledge is constructed in various academic disciplines. The courses taken within Disciplinary Perspectives introduce students to concepts and methodologies of that particular broad disciplinary realm. These courses use the content to expose the methodologies that disciplines use to arrive at that knowledge. These courses provide students with the genuine basis for integrative learning in the Constellations and in the majors. Provided with such an understanding, students are better prepared to take on more in-depth work in a variety of disciplines, and apply other disciplinary approaches to their own major-specific work. Students will take courses in the following areas:

Constellations are groupings of courses around broad themes that can be addressed using multi- and interdisciplinary perspectives. The groupings would consist of courses from multiple disciplines. Constellations build upon the skills acquired in the Foundations courses and the base of knowledge and methodologies acquired in the Disciplinary Perspectives courses.  Constellations will allow students to apply higher-level thinking and communication skills while increasing the breadth and depth of their education.  The Constellations will be structured to help students integrate ideas from different disciplines, as well as the co-curricular, in an intentional way.  They will allow students see the connections between what they have learned in different general education courses, as well as help them make connections between the general education curriculum and their major.  All constellations will have an interdisciplinary integrative experience. Students will take courses in a Constellation from minimum of three disciplines.  The Constellations will be phased in over a three year period as follows:

  • Initial choices for Fall 2015:

Diversity:

FRN 303 French Culture/Civilization  
GER 215 Social Aspects of Aging   
GRM 305 German Culture and Civilization   
HIS 333 British Empire  
HIS 350 American Colonial History (1607-1760) 
HIS 362 Human Trafficking and Slavery, Then and Now  
HIS 370 History of Alcohol and Drugs in American Life  
HIS 388 Race and Racism in the Americas  
HIS 390 Women in the United States: A History 
HIS 391 Women and War  
HIS 460 The Civil Rights Movement   
LIT 344 Love and Sex in Literature 
LIT 346 Literature and Society  
LIT 382 Women Writers  
MUS 286 Jazz History 
MUS 287 American Popular Music  
PHL 224 Being Human  
PHL 380 Women, Gender, and Philosophy  
PSY 440 Personality  
REC 200 Introduction to Therapeutic Recreation  
REL 381 Women and Religion  
SOC 225 The Family 
SOC 260 Gender and Society  
SOC 315 Ethnic and Minority Relations  
SPN 307 Spanish Civilization and Culture 
SPN 308 Spanish-American Civilization and Culture  
WGS 341 History of Women’s Rhetorics 
WGS 344 Love and Sex in Literature 
WGS 380 Women, Gender, and Philosophy 
WGS 381 Women and Religion 
WGS 382 Women Writers  
WRT 341 History of Women’s Rhetorics  

Health/Wellness:

BIO 216 Unseen Life 
G 241 International Service Learning: Making a Difference in a Globalizing World 
G 242 International Service Learning: Making a Difference in a Globalizing World  
GER 215 Social Aspects of Aging 
GER 312 Psychological Aspects of Aging 
GER 330 Death, Dying, and Bereavement  
GER 410 Health In Later Years  
NUR 385 Comparative Health Care  
PE 234 Wellness, Fitness and Lifestyle Management  
PHL 346 Bioethics  
PSY 215 Sustainability and Psychology  
PSY 230 Abnormal Psychology  
PSY 312 Psychological Aspects of Aging  
REC 230 Connecting Leisure, Health and Wellness  
REC 390 Meeting Children’s Needs Through Movement  

Media and Popular Culture:

HIS 409 The Middle Ages in Film   
HIS 422 Holocaust in Film  
LIT 373 Graphic Literature  
LIT 391 Literature of Terror   
LIT 393 Literature and Film  
LIT 395 Fantasy Literature  
MUS 245 Exploring Music in Film  
MUS 287 American Popular Music 
MUS 288 History of Rock and Roll    
MUS 296 History of Musical Theatre 
MUS 297 Survey of Music Industry  
PHL 331 Philosophy and Reality  
PHL 395 Philosophy and Film  
REL 368 Religion, Society, and Culture  
SPM 230 Concepts of Social Media Platforms  
WRT 320 Digital Writing: Theory and Practice  
WRT 380 Literary Publishing  

Environmental Sustainability:

BIO 210 Introduction to Marine Biology 
BIO 212 Environmental Biology  
BIO 218 Plants and People  
CHM 202 (CHM102) Chemistry and Society  
ECO 315 Environmental and Natural Resource Economics 
ECO 340 Economic Development 
ECO 345 The Economics of Urban Revitalization  
G 261 (G361) Introduction to Geographic Information Systems  
G 352 Geographic Perspectives on Sustainability  
HIS 387 North American Environmental History  
LIT 379 Literature and the Environment  
PHL 240 Environmental Ethics  
PSY 215 Sustainability and Psychology  

  • Additional choices for Fall 2016:

Aesthetics/Creativity:

ART 215 Drawing I  
ART 231 (ART110) Concepts of Design 
ART 232 (ART112) Concepts of Figure Drawing 
ART 233 (ART114) Concepts of Painting  
ART 234 (ART116) Concepts of Sculpture 
ART 235 (ART134) Concepts of Computer Graphics  
ART 245 Photography I  
FLM 280-89 Special Topics in Film Directors  
FLM 380 Film Theory and Criticism  
HIS 302 Renaissance and Reformation  
LIT 210 Studies in Criticism and Theory  
LIT 343 The Experience of Poetry  
LIT 381 Literary Theory  
MUS 286 Jazz History 
MUS 288 History of Rock and Roll  
MUS 296 History of Musical Theatre  
PHL 351 Philosophy and the Arts  
PHL 395 Philosophy and Film  
THE 275 Playwriting  
THE 320 Scene Design  
THE 322 Costume Design  
WRT 275 Playwriting  
WRT 372 Poetry Writing 
WRT 373 Creative Nonfiction 
WRT 377 Screenwriting 
WRT 382 Fiction Writing  

Big Ideas:

BIO 234 (BIO120) Evolution and Biodiversity  
FRN 315 French Literature I 
FRN 316 French Literature II  
GRM 315 German Literature I 
GRM 316 German Literature II  
HIS 302 Renaissance and Reformation 
HIS 315 History of Technology to 1550 
HIS 320 Europe after 1914 
HIS 330 History of Britain I and II  
HIS 353 The Jacksonian Era (Middle Period, 1816-1846)  
LIT 210 Studies in Criticism and Theory 
LIT 285 European Literature to 1600  
LIT 323 Shakespeare I 
LIT 324 Shakespeare II  
LIT 347 Literature and Psychology 
LIT 375 James Joyce 
LIT 380 Major Authors and Literary Traditions  
LIT 381 Literary Theory 
LIT 386 Literary Philosophers 
MUS 245 Exploring Music in Film  
PHL 235 Ancient to Modern Philosophy 
PHL 236 The Enlightenment to Postmodern Philosophy   
PHL 321 Philosophy and Knowledge 
PHL 351 Philosophy and the Arts  
PHL 380 Women, Gender, and Philosophy 
PHL 383 Philosophy of Religion  
PS 361 American Political Thought 
PS 368 Ancient Political Thought  
PS 369 Modern Political Thought  
PSY 440 Personality  
REL 270 Tradition and Culture of Judaism  
REL 275 Tradition and Culture of Christianity  
SPN 315 Introduction to the Literature of Spain 
SPN 316 Introduction to the Literature of Spanish America   
THE 416 Modern Drama  
WGS 341 History of Women’s Rhetorics 
WGS 380 Women, Gender, and Philosophy  
WRT 305 Rhetorical Theory 
WRT 341 History of Women’s Rhetorics  

Children and the Family:

G 241 International Service Learning: Making a Difference in a Globalizing World 
G 242 International Service Learning: Making a Difference in a Globalizing World  
GER 312 Psychological Aspects of Aging 
GER 330 Death, Dying, and Bereavement  
HSV 200 (BEH200) Applied Youth Development  
HSV 240 (SOC240) Theory and Policy for the Human Service Professional  
PSY 221 Child and Adolescent Development 
PSY 223 Early Childhood Development  
PSY 312 Psychological Aspects of Aging  
REC 390 Meeting Children’s Needs Through Movement  
SOC 225 The Family  
SPE 200 Special Education Processes and Procedure and Cognitive Development of Diverse Learners in a Standards Aligned System  
SPE 301 Literacy Development and Instruction in Core and Intervention Areas Including Inclusive Practices  
WRT 374 Writing Children’s Literature  

Globalization:

BIO 218 Plants and People  
CHM 202 (CHM102) Chemistry and Society  
FLM 340-49 Special Topics in National Cinemas  
FRN 303 French Culture/Civilization  
G 332 Globalizing Economic World 
G 348 Cultures and Environments Field Series  
G 350 Survey of Canada  
GRM 305 German Culture and Civilization  
HIS 300 Ancient History (Prehistory to 476) 
HIS 301 Medieval Civilization 
HIS 331 History of Britain I and II  
HIS 333 British Empire  
HIS 362 Human Trafficking and Slavery, Then and Now 
HIS 367 Recent America, 1945-Present  
HIS 441 Native American History  
IBS 401 International Economics  
LIT 389 Postcolonial Theory  
MUS 281 World Music  
NUR 385 Comparative Health Care  
PHL 343 Ethical Issues in Peace and Conflict 
PHL 347 Philosophy of Law  
PS 260 Comparative Politics  
PS 304 American-East Asian Relations 
PS 308 International Political Economy  
PSC 202 Science and Sustainability  
SPN 307 Spanish Civilization and Culture 
SPN 308 Spanish-American Civilization and Culture  

  • Additional choices for Fall 2017:

Community:

BIO 210 Introduction to Marine Biology  
BUS 350 Management of Not-for-Profit Operations  
ECO 345 The Economics of Urban Revitalization  
G 331 Metropolitan Development  
G 336 Historical Geography of North America  
HIS 205 Oral History: Techniques and Research  
HIS 334 History of Modern Ireland  
HIS 350 American Colonial History (1607-1760) 
HIS 352 The Revolutionary Era in America 
HIS 353 The Jacksonian Era (Middle Period, 1816-1846)  
HIS 364 Civil War and Reconstruction, 1861-1877  
HIS 370 History of Alcohol and Drugs in American Life  
HIS 386 Historical Geography of North America 
HIS 388 Race and Racism in the Americas  
PS 242 State and Local Government  
PS 306 International Organizations  
PS 406 International Peace and Security  
SOC 340 Urban Sociology  

Peace/Conflict/Ethics and Justice:

HIS 320 Europe after 1914  
HIS 334 History of Modern Ireland 
HIS 352 The Revolutionary Era in America  
HIS 364 Civil War and Reconstruction, 1861-1877 
HIS 366 Twentieth Century American History, 1914-1945 
HIS 367 Recent America, 1945-Present  
HIS 391 Women and War  
HIS 440 History of Terrorism  
HIS 462 U.S. in Vietnam  
MUS 299 Music and Culture Since 1900  
PHL 343 Ethical Issues in Peace and Conflict 
PHL 347 Philosophy of Law  
PS 260 Comparative Politics  
PS 302 International Relations 
PS 303 American Foreign Policy 
PS 306 International Organizations   
PS 406 International Peace and Security  


Professionalism/Leadership and Entrepreneurship:

BUS 350 Management of Not-for-Profit Operations  
FRN 203 French for Business  
G 261 (G361) Introduction to Geographic Information Systems  
G 331 Metropolitan Development  
GER 320 Working with Older Adults  
GRM 203 German for Business  
MGT 225 Organizational Behavior  
MGT 380 Leadership and Change in Organizations  
MUS 297 Survey of Music Industry  
PHL 342 Professional Ethics  
PS 242 State and Local Government  
PS 312 Politics of Public Policy  
PS 363 The Presidency  


Science/Technology:

BIO 216 Unseen Life  
BIO 234 (BIO120) Evolution and Biodiversity  
G 261 (G361) Introduction to Geographic Information Systems  
HIS 315 History of Technology to 1550 
HIS 320 Europe after 1914  
HUM 242 Science and Religion  
MAT 391 Cryptology  
MUS 299 Music and Culture Since 1900  
PHL 390 Philosophy of Technology  
PS 312 Politics of Public Policy  

Academic Minors

Minors are academic credentials earned by students in an area other than their major. To complete a minor, a student must complete a minimum of 15 credits, which may include both upper- and lower-division courses as defined by the specific requirements of the department offering the minor.

All students completing a minor must earn a cumulative grade point average of 2.0 in these designated courses, and take a minimum of nine credits of coursework in the minor at York College to have their minor appear on their transcript. Students may not complete a minor following graduation.

Students may choose from the follow minors:

Accounting Finance Not-For-Profit Management
Advertising Fine Art Philosophy
African/African-American Studies French Photography
American History Geography Physics
Anthropology German Political Science
Applied Youth Development Gerontology Professional Writing
Art History Hospitality Marketing Psychology
Athletic Coaching Human Resource Management Public Administration
Biology Human Services Public Relations
Business Administration Intelligence Analysis Religious Studies
Business Analytics International Business Retailing
Chemistry International Management Sociology
Computer Information Systems International Studies Spanish
Computer Science Legal Studies Speech Communication
Continuous Improvement Literary Studies Supply Chain Operations Management
Creative Thinking and Theory Management Sustainability/Environmental Studies
Creative Writing Marketing Theatre
Criminal Justice Marketing Communications Visual Communication
Criminalistics Marketing Management Women’s and Gender Studies
Economics Mathematics World History
Entrepreneurship Music  
Ethics Music Industry  
Film Studies Musical Theatre  

 

Detailed information about each individual minor and the course requirements is located within the Programs of Study  .  Major and minor combinations should be reviewed in the process of declaring a major.